Monthly Archives: January 2012

JAPANESE JANUARY

This month´s favorite: Japanese illustrators (Japan)

From an early age, I have absolutely adored bookstores. A beautiful book combined with a cup of a quality coffee, is a request begin of an ordinary day.

It was on an ordinary Monday morning (to be specific) that I bumped into a non-ordinary book — in a quite ordinary bookstore. Japanese illustration now (Thames & Hudson), is an example-packed overview of Japanese illustrations, showcasing the work of 100 of Japan’s most successful contemporary artists and designers.

Here are few examples to tickle your taste bud!

Akikio Matsuo 

Masayoshi Mizuho

“Kinpro” Chisato Shinya

Saeko Tagagi

Kazuya Taoka

Kosuke Ikea

Mimic


Mizuki Abe

Photos taken from Google images

As you can see, the illustrations embrace a huge range of styles — from traditional to futuristic and everything in between. The range of amazing images and subjects in this book is hugely memorable and an exciting journey to the utterly idiosyncratic but wonderful world of the Japanese sensibility.

Japanese illustrators are on the top of the agenda on this last day of January 2012!

Book: Japanese Illustation Now

Complete list of the artists: Akiko Matsuo, Atsushi Matsubayashi, Aya Ota, Ayako Okubo, Chigi, Chinatsu sozen, Cocolo, Dragon 76, Eito Yoshikawa, Foorider, Hal Watanabe, Hargon’s Wig, Heisuke Kitazawa, Hideki Tanaka, Hiroaki Yamadera, Hiroki Tsukuda, Hiromi Toriyama, Hiroshi Yoshii, Hiroyuki Izutsu, Hiroyuki Muso, Imaitoonz, Ippei Gyoubu, Itoman, Kahori Maki, Kana Nagano, Karol Hironaka, Kazuhiko Ifuku, Kazuko Tsuji, Kazuya Taoka, Keiko Enobi (Atoron), Kentaro Hisa, Kinpro, Komtena, Kosuke Ikeda, Kouzou Sakai, Koya Okada, Kurono, Kurumi Aoyama, Mako, Mamico, Mamoru Yamamoto, Manabu Hassegawa, Marumiyan, Masaru Yamaguchi, Masayoshi Mizuho, Mashu Oki, Mayko Fry, Megumi Terada, Minako Saito Botsford, Minchi, Misako Aono, Mizuki Abe, Moe Furuya, Naoshi, Natsuki Arai, Natsuki Lee, Natsuko Yoshino, Nico, Norico Uramoto, Red Hot Mama, Ryohei Hase, Ryohei Yamashita, Ryoichi Iso, Ryu Itadani, Ryuji Shishido, Saeko Takagi, Satoshi Matsuzawa, Satoshi Shigihara, Sayaka, Seevert Works, Seijiro Kubo, Shiro Taniguchi, Shobu Tsuchiya, Shah, Shojonotomo, Shu-thang Grafix, Shuhei Tabuchi, Smo, Susumu Yamauchi, Tadaomi Shibuya, Takashi Yamasaki, Takenaka, Takeru Toyokura, Taku Anekawa, Tamio Abe, Tatsuro Kiuchi, Tent, Tomohiro Yasui, Tomomi Ohsugi, Toshifumi Tanabu, Toshikazu Sasao, Tsukasa Tomoyose 
(Atoron), Wieden+Kennedy 
Tokyo lab, Yoshikazu Takai, Yukinori Dehara, Yusaku Maeda, Yusuke Saitoh, Yuta Miyazaki, Yutanpo Shirane and Yuuiti Miyakawa

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Filed under Art, Favourite of the month, Illustrations, Net stroll

THE DEMAND IS HIGHER THAN EVER

Curator talk: Marín Björt Valtýsdóttir (Iceland)

When did you start curating? Tell us something about your educational background?

My first experience with curating was back in high school, setting up our graduation art exhibition. We were many and had very different backgrounds, so it was quite a task putting up the show. However, we did work and the outcome was better than we had hoped fore! As for further curating for my behalf, there haven’t been many opportunities. Curating is not a part of our program in the arts department of University of Iceland, the classes that teach the subject are small classes and fill up quickly so it is difficult to get in them, so going abroad is the only option to become a professional curator. But since we do know what curating is and we are curious about it a student gallery was opened fall of 2011. The gallery, which is called Artíma Gallerí, is giving us opportunity to try out curating and finding other people that are interested in the subject of curating and running a gallery.

What is the artistic field of your curatorial practice?

Usually I deal with 2d artworks like paintings or drawings. It was interesting when we decided to include one of Hekla Björt Helgadóttir’s pieces, which consisted of a lamp, broken plates and a stone heart, in the 3rd show of Artíma Gallerí. Once we started planning, it turned out that the piece would work better as an installation using the afforded space in the gallery in a different way than we first envisioned.

Is there a difference in curating different field of arts, etc. paintings, videos, interactive works or a piece of net art?

In retrospect it didn’t seem to matter much to me in which form or medium the artworks were but of course sooner or later practical matters will need to be addressed. In an ideal situation, the curator takes away the burden from the artist, of matching the artworks to an audience in a meaningful way. In reality this often results in a very close collaboration between the curator and the artist, which can be slightly less glamorous. Hammering nails into the wall or holding the ladder while attaching support strings.

From Artíma #3, work by Hekla Björt Helgasóttir, curated by Marín Björt Valtýsdóttir. Photos/Konsthopp

What kind of qualities do you think a curator should have?

Curating is a broad field of work, and every show is different. I think the artist makes the biggest difference in putting up an exhibition and how fluently it goes. When the collaboration between the artist and the curator is good, magic can happen.

A good curator sees the needs of the artist and the exhibition and does what it takes to combine it in to an interesting exhibition. Flexibility and diplomacy is important, as are social and communication skills since a big part of putting up an exhibition is working with other people and finding common grounds to work from. A curator is also a facilitator, concerning herself with practical matters.

Do you think that new and digital media used in contemporary art has brought new aspects to arts and curating? Yes or no, explain why?

Digital media is very fascinating because it can be very vivid and alive. Due to my young age I cannot say much about the effects it has had on curating since digital media used as an art form is older than I am. What I can tell is that digital media and interactive works are becoming more and more popular in the museum world so the medium is marking its place in the ‘traditional’ art world.

In times of “You Tube” and the Internet, do you think a curator is still needed?

I don’t see the Internet as having much effect on curating, as in making curating unnecessary. Museums and galleries are becoming more and more popular each year and new art fairs seem to be popping up all over the world, so the demand for a curator, if anything, is higher than ever. Youtube creates an abundance of information; years worth of video are uploaded daily on Youtube alone. My partner pointed out to me that curating is engaged in actively by the online community. People have created channels or blogs with little or no original content, consisting of other people’s artworks both collecting and connecting them, cross media.

What are your curatorial plans for the future? What are your personal wishes, hopes and perspectives in curating?

Curating is a very interesting field of work, it offers you an exciting environment to work in, where you get to know artists and their work in a close and remarkable way. I hope to do more curating in the future since I find it an enjoyable experience. If I were to further my studies in curating, I would have to go abroad and at the moment I have no plans, I would be lying though to say that I haven’t looked into it.

What is the future of professional curating from your point of view?

Curating is a profession that seems to be on the rise. With more and more museums bursting up and art fairs existing in every country I think the field of curating is going to bloom in the coming years.

From Artíma #3, work by Hekla Björt Helgasóttir, curated by Marín Björt Valtýsdóttir. Photo/Konsthopp

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Filed under Art, Art festival, Collage/Clip Art, Conversation, Digital Art, Group exhibit, Installation, Konsthopp, Media, Paintings, Reykjavík, Uncategorized, Visual Art

COTTON RAGS

On-going: 21st of January – 5th of February 2012, Íslensk Grafík (Reykjavik)

Do you ever think about the material behind each art work? Where it might come from?

Well, it might come from your old t-shirt, your parent´s floral bedspread or — even — your grandmother´s curtain.

The above pieces are woven with cotton rags. Each piece is approximately 1m²

Photographs by Konsthopp

Cotton is today grown all over the world but is most often associated with India. Anna María Lind, the artist behind these textile work, met her curator, Deborah Kraak, last summer. Their meeting led to collaboration where Anna Lind wove and Deborah wrote.

The curator explained the cotton journey in the exhibition catalogue:

… After spinning, cotton yarns are woven or knitted into fabrics which are then dyed or printed. Production is now global, often from the industrially developing parts of the world. Even a simple T-shirt may be the work of several countries´labors: to grow the cotton, spin it, weave it, cut it into pattern pieces, and fashion it into garment.

— Deborah Kraak

Keep this in mind, next time you buy yourself a 10€ T-shirt at H&M!

Date: 21st of January – 5th of February 2012

Artist: Anna María Lind Geirsdóttir and Deborah Kraak

Place: Íslensk Grafík (Icelandic Printmakers´ Association Gallery), Tryggvagata 17, Reykjavík

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Filed under Art, Konsthopp, Reykjavík, Solo exhibit, Textile Art

ARTIST DISCOVERY #1

Graphic designer: Elisa Vendramin (Italy)

It´s always gratifying to discover new artist. Shortly before Christmas I was hunting for seemly gifts at PopUp verzlun in Harpa.  The search seemed to be everlasting — and then — suddenly, I saw something that caught my eye.

Northen lights by Elisa Vendramin – Digital print

Daylight by Elisa Vendramin – Digital print

Vatnajökull by Elisa Vendramin – Digital print

Northen lights 2 by Elisa Vendramin – Digital print

These digital prints are for sale. The artist — Elisa Vendramin — is an Italian graphic designer, currently based in London. Elisa works in image making, where she combines delicate drawings with fantastical, three-dimentional settings and landscapes. She is also fascinated in experimenting with different printing and production techniques.

According to the Mei Moses All Art index number, it´s the right time to invest in art. At least, it seems to be at lower-risk than investing in stocks these days!

A photo brain. A self portrait by the artist

Photographs belong to Elisa Vendramin

Artist: Elisa Vendramin

Place: Pop-up market at Harpa, Reykjavik concert hall

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Filed under Art, Digital Art, Illustrations, Konsthopp, Photography, Print, Reykjavík, Uncategorized

EXCITING WEEKEND AHEAD

Friday — the 20th of January 2012

There is an exciting weekend ahead for art lovers and aesthetes in Reykjavik. Santiago Sierra initiate the program with a performance, The Black cone in Austurvöllur today at 13.00.

For those who hunger for more Sierra, there is an exhibition opening with his work and polemical documentaries in Reykjavik Art Museum, Hafnarhúsið tonight at 20.00

No pope © Santiago Sierra, photograph courtesy of Estudio de Santiago Sierra 

Saturday — the 21st of January 2012

The unusual exhibition; Cyborg(s):Strange Creators and Creations will be launched in Kópavogur Art Museum, Gerðarsafn tomorrow at 15.00.

The curators of the show are Úlfhildur Dagsdóttir and Helgi Hjaltalín Eyjólfsson but the exhibition is based on the synonymous book by Úlfhildur which explores man´s fearful fascination with machines and technology. The exhibition will be opened by the Icelandic writer, Sjón.

The cover of the book; Sæborgin: Stefnumót líkama og tækni í ævintýri  og  veruleika. Photo taken from Spássían.is

At 17.00 same day, Gallery Kling og Bang will open their first exhibition of the year; Powerful picture (obsession-original) by Erling T. V. Klingenberg.

Sunday — the 22nd of January 2012

The exhibitionUnder Deconstruction by Libía Castro and Ólafur Ólafsson is now running in the National Gallery of Iceland. In relation to the show,  a lecture by the literary scholar; Hjálmar Sveinsson will be held on Sunday at 14.00.

Under Deconstruction was commissioned by the Icelandic Art Center for the Pavilion of Iceland at the 54th International Art Exhibition – La Biennale di Venezia in 2011 and was curated by Ellen Blumenstein.

Your Country Doesn´t Exist – 2011. Photograph courtesy of Libía and Ólafur

Happy art weekend everyone!

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Filed under Art, Art Magazine, Artist books, Artist Talk, Comic Art, Conversation, Digital Art, Game Art, Illustrations, Installation, Konsthopp, Lecture, Media, Music, Performance, Photography, Political Art, Print, Reykjavík, Sculptures, Solo exhibit, Uncategorized, Video Art, Visual Art

NO GLOBAL TOUR

Performances: 16th – 19th of January 2012 (Reykjavik)

For the last few years, the Spanish “controversial” artist, Santiago Sierra has moved a site and situation specific work from country to country. The project NO Global tour refers to a sculpture, shaped as the word “NO” spelled in an Arial typeface, weighed half a ton, and measured about 5.10 feet high by 13.12 feet long.

Sierra chose the word NO, a negation that could travel around the world and become the monumental leading character in a road movie. In February 2011 the NO, Global tour film was presented at the Berlin International Film Festival.

The NO sculpture outside the Parliament of Iceland

Photo taken from visir.is

The NO Global Tour has travelled to; Lucca, Berlin, Milan, Bernburg, Toronto, Hamilton, Buffalo, Detroit, Cleveland, Pittsburgh, Rotterdam, Maastricht, Brussels, London, New York, Miami Beach, Livorno, Genoa, Monte-Carlo, Marseille, Montpellier, Lourdes, Madrid, Washington, Salamanca, Carrara, Nagoya (Japan) and Katowice (Poland).

Now, it´s possible to spot this globe trot sculpture in Reykjavik!

An exhibition by Santiago Sierra will be launched at Hafnarhúsið next Friday. The Spanish rebel chose the 20th of January to open his exhibition in Iceland, but on this particular day — three years ago — the largest demonstration in the nation history broke out, outside the parliament.

Date: 16th – 19th of January 2012

Artist: Santiago Sierra

Places: Performance held around Reykjavik in relation to Santiago Sierra’s exhibition at Hafnarhús.

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Filed under Art, Konsthopp, Performance, Political Art, Reykjavík, Sculptures, Solo exhibit, Uncategorized, Video Art, Visual Art

“LA QUE SABé”

Closed: 17th of December 2011, Candyland (Stockholm)

When the baby was born there came some astrologers.

“We have seen her star rising and are here to give her our honour”

(Valeria Montti Colque)

Photographs by Konsthopp

I was looking through my photos last night and found some I’d taken at Valeria’s Montti Colque exhibition — LA QUE SABé — early last month. The exhibition was inspired by the poem “The Thunder, Perfect Mind, and as the poem it concerns the divine feminine nature.

For I am the first and the last.

I am the honored one and the scorned one.

I am the whore and the holy one.

I am the wife and the virgin.

I am the mother and the daughter.

I am the members of my mother.

I am the barren one

…….

For I am knowledge and ignorance.

I am shame and boldness.

I am shameless; I am ashamed.

I am strength and I am fear.

I am war!

(Taken from “The Thunder, Perfect Mind”)

I love the poem and I really much liked the exhibition so I hope the photographs give you a little taste of the night and inspires you on these dark & cold days (at least up in the North!). If it isn’t enough, check out additional photographs on our facebook profile or learn about the artist and her previous work here.

Now you can also follow Konsthopp with Bloglovin!

Artist: Valeria Montti Colque

Date: 3rd of December – 17th of December 2011

Place: Candyland, Gotlandsgatan 76, Stockholm

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Filed under Art, Collage/Clip Art, Installation, Konsthopp, Sculptures, Solo exhibit, Stockholm