Category Archives: Art festival

dOCUMENTA (13)

Weekend breather: dOCUMENTA (13)

Big apologies about our absent lately! I’m hoping that a short brief through our photos from dOCUMENTA will cheer you up and give you a fresh air for the weekend.

We will be back on track sooner than you expect, so stay tuned!

/Ingunn & Írena

 

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NEW ART FESTIVAL

Zinkovy Arts Festival: 1st – 30th of September 2012 (Czech Republic)

Zinkovy Arts Festival, a brand new arts festival will be launched in Žinkovy, Czech Republic 1st of September. This will be the inaugural exhibition in a series of shows that will become a part of the diverse european cultural landscape, positioning Zinkovy Arts Festival as a part of the a narrative of contemporary art. The Pilzen area which includes the Zinkovy Arts Festival has been nominated to be the cultural centre for Europe in 2015.

The exhibition aims to collaborate and strengthen the already excising cultural infrastructures found in the Czech Republic, as well as creating a platform where international artists work can meet. Using art as a medium for development, articulation and exchange of ideas. By introducing artist to a wider context, with an emphasis on transcultural exchange, art becomes a medium for development, articulation and exchange of ideas. The participating artist have the opportunity to work on location from two or more weeks prior to the opening. This will create the opportunity for potential collaboration and discussion with a multitude of artists.

— Read more here


Date: 1st – 30th of September 2012

Creative Director: Hrafnhildur Gissurardottir (IS)

Artists: Aleksandra Vajd (CZ), Hynek Alt (CZ), Michela Pelusio (IT), Rini Antonissen (NL), Hans Christian Dethleffsen (DE), Julia Amelia Fischer (DE), Christopher Charles (AU), James Hensby (AU), Bogomir Doringer (RS), Daniel Von Keller (CH), Þórdís Erla Zoega (IS), Denisa Kollarova (SK), Sona Borodacova (SK), Mirko Lazovic (RS), Nina Frankova (CZ) , Jack Pam( AU), Kristinn Guðmundsson (IS), Peter Sattler (AT), Hrund Atladóttir (IS), Björk Viggósdóttir (IS), Elva Guðmundsdóttir (IS), Jude Crilly (CA), Floris Schönfeld (NL), Wietska van der Ploeg (NL),  Ada Avetist (AT),  Anne de Boer (NL) , Daniel Dressel (DE), Eloise Bonneviot (FR), Hrafnhildur Helgadóttir (IS), Sæmundur Þór Helgason (IS), Jason Hendrik Handsma (NL) and Jiri Makovec (CZ)

Place: Zinkovy Chateau. Western Bohemia, Czech Republic

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AUTUMN ASSEMBLY IN AUGUST

Flavor of the month: Watershed

After a long and “oh-so-wanted” summer break — witch passed by “oh-so-amazingly-fast” — I can finally welcome my favorite season. The fall.

Although it´s sunny and over 20 °C outside my window (it doesn´t get any warmer here in Iceland) — all I can think about is misty days, multicolored leaves and my new umbrella.

Photos taken from google and pinterest

Watershed, a turning point or — a milestone are typical for this time of the year. Exciting assignments are coming up. Accordingly — the editors of Konsthopp are back to school, trying new exciting education. And I will finally move to my own “oh-so-wanted” apartment, with my “oh-so-fat” newborn.

Despite days loading work and other ethical obligations (e.g; changing diapers and doing boring housework!) — Konsthopp will try to keep on track, reporting live from the Nordic alternative art scene!

Happy fall everyone!

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Filed under Art, Art festival, Favourite of the month, Iceland, Konsthopp, Stockholm

JOYFUL JUNE

Flavor of the month: Performance art

Over the past weeks I have been asking outsiders what they think about the visual art scene in Iceland. Is it different from the rest of Scandinavian scene? What stands out in the Icelandic art scene today?

The answer was clear.

Most people I spoke to, mentioned the active and very visible performance art scene. It did not surprise me. Our biggest stars in the visual art sectors today are performance artists — with Ragnar Kjartansson and Rúrí in the forefront.

Lord of the castle itch yes” by Leif Holmstrand (2009), CHRYSTAL

 “Back and Forth” by Gatëan Rusquet (2011), ANTI Festival

Mont Blanc” by Mimosa Pale (2011) Berlin. Image/Niina Braun

Peta loves Pollock” by Rakel McMahon (2009)

Dance Drawings” by Meghann Snow (2011), Young Art

Photographs by Konsthopp

Then again, some people might ask — what is performance art?
It is not easy to answer; but I hope the guidelines below might give you a tiny glimpse of what we are talking about when it comes to this specific art form.

THE SYMPTOMS OF PERFORMANCE ART

»Performance Art is live.

»Performance Art has no rules or guidelines. It is art because the artist says it is art. It is experimental.

»Performance Art is not for sale. It may, however, sell admission tickets and film rights.

»Performance Art may be comprise of painting or sculpture (or both), dialogue, poetry, music, dance, opera, film footage, turned on television sets, laser lights, live animals and fire. Or all of the above. There are as many variables as there are artists.

»Performance Art is a legitimate artistic movement. It has longevity (some performance artists, in fact, have rather large bodies of work) and is a degreed course of study in many post-secondary institutions.

»Dada, Futurism, the Bauhaus and the Black Mountain College all inspired and helped pave the way for Performance Art.

»Performance Art is closely related to Conceptual Art. Both Fluxus and Body Art are types of Performance Art.

»Performance Art may be entertaining, amusing, shocking or horrifying. No matter which adjective applies, it is meant to be memorable.

— By Shelley Eesak,  ArtHistoryAbout.com

This month we are going to dig deeper into the field of this ancient art form!

Related entries includes; “The weird girls project” and “I would like to set a trend.”

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NORTHERN LIGHTS

Final words: Icelandic Arts Festival

The summer is the season of social gatherings. Fun, festivities and festivals. Beside the fun (and the fest) — festivals are one of the most important tools of any given art market. Folks have a chance to get an overview; explore and enjoy contemporary art.

Most of my favorites festivals are held away from the noisy city. Close to nature — where creative people meets — miracles can happen. Scandinavians are also known to enjoy an especially close relationship to nature. Drinking a flat beer from a bottle, sleeping on a sopping ground — singing along with old popular songs. A necessary part of an overall bulletproof program.

The life does´t get any better.

Northern lights, Jökulsárlón

These two alternative art festivals highlights the beauty of Icelandic nature and national spirit.

Æringur (Rif, Snæfellsnes)

Æringur is an international, artists run festival that is held in a different location every year and focuses on the smaller communities dotting the Icelandic coastline. The festival allows artists to experience the atmosphere outside the capital region and invites them into a space that is not necessarily intended for art exhibitions. It is conceived as a site specific project, that deals with the society and the environment it is held in. Therefore the artists, taking part in the project, stay for a number of days on site before the opening, to develop and work on their projects.

More Northern lights, Snæfellsnes

LungA (Seyðisfjörður)

LungA Art festival is a yearly event held on the east coast of Iceland, in Seydisfjördur. Seyðisfjordur is a small town, decorated with old, well maintained houses and surrounded by an extraordinary views over the mountains and fjords. The festival creates a space were electric vibes from various art forms melt together when artist from all over the world unites at one place through their creativity

Even more Northern lights, Iceland

Photographs taken from google image

.The life is now. Live a little!

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DAY TRIPPER

Vernissages: 19th of May 2012, Reykjavik Arts Festival

Photographs by Konsthopp

Date: 17th of May, throughout the summer 2012.

What: 1857, A kassen, Anonymous, AIM Europe, Box, Endemi, Goksøyr & Martens, IC98,  The Icelandic Love Corporation, Institut før Degeneret Kunst, Jóna Hlíf Halldórsdóttir & Hlynur Hallsson, Kling & Bang, Learning Site & Jaime Stapleton, M.E.E.H., Nomeda & Gediminas Urbonas and Group 4.333”, Melissa Dubbin & Aaron S. Davidson, No Gods No Parents (UKS), NÝLÓ & Archive of Artist Run Initiatives, Raflost & Steina, Sofia Hultén & Ivan Seal, Superflex, The Artist Formerly Known as Geist, The Awareness Muscle Team , The Leyline Project, The New Beauty Council with Elin Strand Ruin, Mariana Alves & Katarina Bonnevier, Útidúr and Wooloo.

Where: Litla kaffistofan. LÁ Art MuseumThe National Gallery of IcelandThe Nordic houseThe Icelandic Sculptural AssociationEndemii8, galleryReykjavik Art Museum – HafnarhúsASÍ Art MuseumKling & Bang, gallery, SÍM, Nýló and Artima gallery.

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THE HIGH SPIRITS OF COLLABORATING

— Interview with Jonatan Habib Engqvist (Sweden)

Photograph taken from OCA

Photograph taken from OCA

Reykjavík Arts Festival 2012 had its kick off at Harpa (Reykjavík Concert and Conference Hall) on Friday night. Since 2004 the festival has been held annually in the capital city of Iceland, each year concentrating specifically on different fields of arts. Last year it was music — this year it’s visual arts. As we mentioned in the post (I)ndependent People, the large-scale exhibition is a collaborative visual arts project that involves many of Reykjavík’s various exhibition spaces during the festival and throughout the summer. Two weeks ago I was lucky enough to have the opportunity to meet up with the curator of (I)ndependent people, Jonatan Habib Engqvist, in his time-intervals between answering e-mails and preparing last-minute actions. Over a long cup of coffee Jonatan told me all about the exhibition, his personal speculations about the project and his own role as a curator.

From the opening at Harpa Friday night

ONE BIG EXPERIMENT

The idea of (I)ndependent people came after a seminar called Alternative North that was hold in Reykjavík in 2011, concerning the economical crises and artists initiatives. The last two biennial formats at Reykjavík Arts Festival (curated by Jessica Morgan in 2005 & Ólafur Elíasson in 2008) were some “big deals” with big budgets. In between there were the financial crisis — and now it’s Jonatan’s turn to curate a biennale with artist-run initiatives.

“The brief I got from Reykajvík Arts Festival (Alternative power station of the North) was strong, even though it seemed like a quite job with compound co-operation between different institutions. But there was something exciting about it in terms of curating and I thought that maybe this complex co-operation might be an interesting focus for the whole biennale.”

Jonatan tells me genuinely how he never thought it would actually work out. He already had his job and gave a radical counter-proposal to the organizers of the festival.

“I thought that maybe this could be the concept itself — the collaboration — to make the biennale to an experiment and see if it holds. I received 100% support. When they said yes to the unbelievable there was no going back. And this whole support makes it a pretty radical exhibition in terms of an international biennale. The conglomerate of art galleries, artist-driven initiatives and artists groups (and their will to co-operate) is what will make this possible. You could say that the entire exhibition is like a one big experiment. Why? Cause it’s fun!”

A SINGLE SIMPLE RULE

“I have received so much support, incredibly much freedom — the organizers are satisfied as long as I keep the budget. Which is incredible and actually pretty cool.”

And from there — the collaboration — the idea starts growing. Jonatan tells me about the idea and how he really wants to take it as far as it goes. There are no solo artists, only groups and collaborations between artists — which is something opposite to the whole biennale logic.

“Normally biennales are based on superstars. And for me the curatorial process is exciting, even though I’ve had to say no to artists that are “big” and which work I like. But I have been very tough — holding hard to a one simple rule. NO solo artists. This is what the whole thing is based on. Everyone work on the same terms, there are no solo exhibitions and beside that there has to be a genuine exchange between partners, a negotiation and artwork that influences the theme.”

HOW MANY CURATORS TO SCREW A LIGHT BULB?

We discuss further the collaboration and I ask Jonatan about his role as a curator. He throws me an insider joke and asks me if I know how many curators I need to screw a light bulb?

“It depends on the budget! Everything will work out (or as they say in Iceland “þetta reddast”) as long as you keep budget. Do it yourself if you can’t afford it … So what I am trying to do is just to take some of the on-going happenings and gather them at one place. That’s what you do as a curator. To gather stuff and see what happens if you put this stuff in the same room. I see one thing there and another thing there — and wander what happens if I put them together. It’s not really that complicated.”

But I’m not sure I can buy that from him. The whole process seems complicated — a hard work. Having a dialogue, sharing visual perspectives, finding the artists right places in the context of the whole …

LIKE A HOUSE OF CARDS

… the whole of which is the collaboration. That is — NO SOLOS. And for Jonatan, being the only curator, makes it a bit bissare.

“It is an exhibition of collaboration, but I’m the only curator — which might create some sort of hirarki. But there is a dialogue, support and a concept that holds and helps working it all out. Still I’m there at the top. But maybe that’s ok. I think that there must be someone in charge, so if there is a disaster they can blame it on me. I might be the one that builds the infrastructure and context but I absolutely see the process as collective. It’s impossible otherwise. But it’s an experiment — bit like a house of cards — and if one cards falls it’s important to have someone who can point out and remind, as a part of the experiment.”

WHERE IS THE ART?

An experiment which is really exciting!The whole concept seems to be a lot about structures, experiments and dialoges — but will there be any art?

“Of course that’s a question that’s popped up in my mind. Working with group of artists is incredibly fun and interesting yet also complicated. The concept of infrastructures, research and experiments is a big part of the exhibition — but at the same time we just want to express art. It’s a framework for the art which is exhibited but not a scale of what you like and what you see. It’s challenging to let the art stand on its own — to see if it holds — and bring to the point both the visual as well as its intuition.”

Photographs taken from Reykjavík Arts Festival facebook page

And that might be an experiment on its own. Be sure to experience you own (I)ndependent people, which was opened yesterday. And if you’re not in Reykjavík, follow the festival with us, we’ll be reporting as much as we can!

xox

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Filed under Art festival, Curator, Curator Talk, Konsthopp, Reykjavik Arts Festival, Stockholm, Uncategorized, Visual Art