Category Archives: Group exhibit

IMAGINATION WITHOUT BORDERS

Closed: 21st of April – 6th of May 2012, Hafnarhúsið (Reykjavik)

Students from the departments of Fine Arts, Design and Architecture at the Iceland Academy of the Arts, exhibited their graduate projects at Reykjavík Art Museum – Hafnarhús, earlier this month. The exhibition is usually impressive and this year was no exception.

Let the pictures speak for themselves.

Photographs by Konsthopp

Washing machine, washing the Icelandic flag ; super-sized swing ; cloud machine ; gramophone (Jónófón) in new costume — the imagination was prevailing at every turn at Hafnarhúsið and wholly without any borders.

Cheers everyone!

Date: 21st of April – 6th of April 2012

Artists: Graduation students from Fine Arts, Design and Architecture Department

Place: Hafnarhúsið, Tryggvagötu 27, Reykjavik

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Filed under Art, Design, Digital Art, Drawings, Fashion, Group exhibit, Installation, Konsthopp, Paintings, Photography, Political Art, Reykjavík, Uncategorized, Video Art, Visual Art, Young Art

TOTAL RECALL

Date: 13th – 29th of April 2012, Studio 44 (Stockholm)

Acryl direct on wall – by Raphael Egli

Collage by Bertram Schilling

Acryl on canvas by Kenneth Pils 

Oil on canvas by Susanne Högdahl Holm

Photographs by Konsthopp

Artists: Raphael EgliSusanne Högdahl Holm, Kate Larson, Kenneth PilsPontus RaudBertram Schilling, Nicholas Smith

Date: 13th -29th of April 2012

Place: Studio 44, Tjärhovsgatan 44, Stockholm

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Filed under Art, Art stroll, Collage/Clip Art, Group exhibit, Paintings, Stockholm

NÚNINGUR / FRICTION

On-going: 14th of April – 13th of May 2012, Listasafn ASÍ (Reykjavik)

The visual art in the city — The city in the visual art

It can be hard to define what is sociopolitical art. But as far as I know  — all art in public sphere have political implication. And since our flavor of this month is sociopolitical art;  it is a must to mention the ongoing project; Núningur (e. Friction).

The project is build upon ideas by couple of artists and scholars and have been under way for a while. Together — the project deliberates about the many-sided connection between visual art and the urban community.

“Veghelgunarsvæði” by Ósk Vilhjálmsdóttir

“Heyr mína bæn” by Katrína Mogensen

“Kleine Welten” by Christian Hasucha

Photographs are taken from the project´s Facebook site

Listasafn ASÍ is working as a kind of center for the project but the the work will be published all over Reyakjvík city this year. An ambitious exhibition catalogue have been released and many open symposium are scheduled in relation to the show. So stay tuned!

Date: 14th of April – 13th of May 2012

Artists: Ásdís Sif Gunnarsdóttir, Ásmundur Ásmundsson, Berglind Jóna Hlynsdóttir, Brynjar Helgason, Christian Hasucha, Elin Wikström, Gunnar J. Árnason, Hjálmar Sveinsson, Hlynur Hallsson, Indriði Arnar Ingólfsson, Ingirafn Steinarsson, Ívar Glói Gunnarsson, Karl Torsten Stallborn, Katrín Eyjólfsdóttir, Katrína Mogensen, Margrét H. Blöndal, Nikulás Stefán Nikulásson, Nína Óskarsdóttir, Páll Haukur Björnsson, Ósk Vilhjálmsdóttir, Ragna Sigurðardóttir, Stefán Óli Baldursson, Una Ösp Steingrímsdóttir, Unnar Örn J. Auðarson, Þorvaldur Þorsteinsson, Þröstur Valgarðsson, and Æsa Sigurjónsdóttir

Curators: Einar Garibaldi Eiríksson, Kristinn E. Hrafnsson and Ólafur Gíslason

Place: Listasafn ASÍ,  Freyjugötu 41, Reykjavík

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Filed under Art, Group exhibit, Konsthopp, Lecture, Multimedia, Performance, Photography, Political Art, Reykjavík, Sociopolitical art, Uncategorized, Video Art

“CURATOR WILL ALWAYS PLAY AN IMPORTANT ROLE”

— Interview with Alexander Jean Edvard le Sage de Fontenay (Iceland)

When did you start curating? Tell us something about your educational background?

During my last couple of years in highschool (Menntaskólinn við Hamrahlíð) I attended numerous of art history classes and art classes. I had an especially inspirational art teacher that year, Louise Hazell A Harris, and I believe I am lucky that she has taught me. The first art show were I was directly involved in the planning, was held on my graduating year. It was an exhibition of her student’s works from one of her classes, which I went to as well. At her request, I helped the teacher promote it in my school, gather art pieces and I even made a flyer.

For me, the ball actually only started rolling for me quite recently. After I began studying Art History at The University of Iceland I got involved in a number of things. I started writing for the school paper (Stúdentablaðið), helped plan events for students studying art history and last but not least, opened a gallery with a few of my fellow students, called Artíma gallery. The reason we went into doing this was in our opinion a lack of practical courses which are available for art history students. This way we get to exercise our curatorial skills.

Our first exhibition opened in October last year (2011). I have been involved in two shows so far. The first one being a group exhibition of works by 14 artists from The Iceland Academy Of Arts. The second exhibition was called S/H/91-93 and was also a group exhibition of ten black & white works by ten artists who all study primary art education.

What is the artistic field of your curatorial practice?

I enjoy making art myself. I guess the artistic field of my curatorial practice is having a say in what art pieces are ultimately selected by the artists, arranging the pieces to ensure that the right mood is achieved in the exhibition space and also helping the artist find the best suitable way for his works to be presented.

Is there a difference in curating different field of arts, etc. paintings, videos, interactive works or a piece of net art?

Of course. Each medium has a mind of it’s own. The best exhibitions in my opinion, are those that include works of different mediums. And where the art pieces are arranged according to the nature of each exhibition space. In S/H/91-93 I had a few installations and a number of wall based works. I nurtured the artists needs while also filling the space accordingly, to create diversity. I tried to create a contrast with the wall-based art and used the installations in between to maintain balance.

From S/H/91-93. #1. “Án titils” by Magnús Ingvar Ágústsson #2. “Út fyrir rammann” by Krista Alexandersdóttir #3. “Undir smásjá” by Sólveig Eir Steward #4. “Eðlislega óeðlislægt” by Kristín Þorláksdóttir

What kind of qualities do you think a curator should have?

I think a curator should be personable and friendly. It is important for him to have a good relationship with the artist (or artists). He should be able to keep cool at all times. He should do little things like bring a pizza when those finishing touches are being added the night before opening a show.  While he should be friendly he should have leader skills and determination. A lot of things may be riding on a show. But regardless if the show is a success or not, the artist (or artists) should have confidence in the curator.

Do you think that new and digital media used in contemporary art has brought new aspects to arts and curating? Yes or no, explain why?

Internet art has been around since the mid 1990s. Since then it has evolved and so has, obviously, all technology. There was a “revolution” in digital video, making it easier for more artists to work with video. So that’s a definite: Yes.

In times of “You Tube” and the Internet, do you think a curator is still needed?

Yes. I think the curator will always play an important role in the art world. Websites such as Youtube, Vimeo, Flickr, Deviant art, Tumblr to name a few, have made it a lot easier for artists to promote themselves. It has also helped a lot of people find what they’re looking for and to discover new things. This does not make a curator less needed. I believe that just like people won’t stop talking to their friends in real life (offline) they won’t stop going to galleries and museums. Because seeing a work of art online is never the same thing as seeing it face-to-face as a part of an exhibition. Period.

What are your curatorial plans for the future? What are your personal wishes, hopes and perspectives in curating?

In April I will be curating an art show in Artíma gallery. It’s going to be the collected works of a couple of vivacious girls. They have shown a lot of potential. One of them is studying fine arts at The Iceland Academy of Arts and the other is in Reykjavik School of Visual Art. It is going to be collaborative work and some independent work from both of them. Video art, a few sculptures and I’m pretty sure there will be some wall-based art as well. I’m excited about that. In June there will hopefully be a big group exhibition to welcome the summer. There has been a discussion of collaborating with another student gallery, run by the fine arts department at The Iceland Academy of Arts. I would like to be part of that.

My wish is that future art galleries that are in similar scale as Artíma won’t have a hard time gathering funding. Unfortunately, today it is quite a task for galleries (even bigger ones than Artíma) to do this. Me and many of my fellow students are in agreement that for art to flourish “the little guys” have to be given some air to breathe.

Curators should be able to work completely hand-in-hand with artists. This is THEIR world. Artists are not supposed to be scared of consulting or collaborating with artist and vice versa.

What is the future of professional curating from your point of view?

Art history as we know it began in the 19th century. The University Of Iceland began offering art history courses less than a decade ago. In just that time a lot has happened. Curators have gotten more attention in Iceland. I believe things will only get better. In times of lessened funds towards the strengthening of artistic practice, I think interest in art and art history will thrive. As long as people keep working hard for what they believe in and others keep showing their support. Lengi lifi listfræðin! (e. long live art history).

From S/H/91-93. #1. “Triptych” by Valdemar Árni Guðmundsson #2. “Femme Individuelle” by Dýrfinna Benita Garðarsdóttir #3. “Lord Donald is a Pale Horse” by Eysteinn Þórðarson #4. “Undir smásjá” by Sólveig Eir Steward

Photographs by Fritz Hendrik Berndsen IV

Alexander Jean Edvard le Sage de Fontenay (1991) is an art history student at University of Iceland. Despite young age, Alexander is already taking his first steps as a curator. He is a member of Artíma gallerí, a curator run gallery in Reykajvik, managed by students of The University of Iceland. Alexander has been involved in two exhibition in the gallery so far, but Konsthopp first met him at the “S/H/91-93” where he curated ten black & white works by equally many artists. He will next be curating an exhibition at the gallery in April. We are already looking forward to keep an eye on this fireball in the future.

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Filed under Curator, Curator Talk, Digital Art, Drawings, Group exhibit, Installation, Konsthopp, Multimedia, Uncategorized, Video Art, Young Art

PHOTOGRAPHS OF THE YEAR

Vernissage: 3rd of March 2012, Gerðarsafn (Kópavogur)

Press photos should reflect the situation in every society at any given time. That’s why I’m always a bit excited when the “Press photo of the year award” in Iceland is announced but Kópavogur art museum (Gerðarsafn) annually houses the event.

According to the selected committee, these pictures stood out in certain categories last year.

Category: “Daily Life” / Eyþór Árnason

Category: “Magazine photo of the year” / Kristinn Magnússon

Category: “Portrait picture of the year” / Rakel Ósk Sigurðardóttir

Category: “Sport photo of the year” / Kristinn Magnússon

Photographs belong to the photographers

For society critics and other thinkers it can be curious to compare the emphasis and trends in press photography between nations. I went to the “Swedish press photo award” last year in Stockholm and now this year in Iceland. At first sight, these two closely related countries seems to have almost nothing in common when it comes to media’s photo coverage. The Swedish press photos mirrors multicultural society, while the geographical isolation of Iceland seems to affect the Icelanders approach to press photography — sometimes in a very positive way.

Anyhow, I have to admit that I’m quite impressed how many Icelandic photographers have gained reputation and respect internationally — especially since most photographers of this country have to travel abroad to get their education. Examples of those includes the young fashion photographers, Saga Sig and Silja Magg and of course — the world known (and self-taught) documentary photographer Rax.

Don´t miss this years “Photograph of the year” in Sweden. The exhibition will be opened the 31st of March in Galleri Kontrast, Stockholm.

Date: 3rd of March – 7th of April 2012

Photographers: Various

Place: Gerðarsafn, Hamraborg 4, Kópavogur

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Filed under Art, Artist books, Digital Art, Group exhibit, Konsthopp, Media, Multimedia, Photography, Reykjavík, Uncategorized

SÆBORGIN: KYNJAVERUR OG ÓKINDUR

On-going: 21st of January – 29th of February 2012, Gerðarsafn (Kópavogur)

One of the most interesting exhibition I have seen this year in Iceland is now running in Gerðarsafn.

Photographs by Konsthopp

With a mixture of art and science this exhibition should attract technic nerds, animators, amateurs of prosthetics technology, reformists and of course anyone who is genuinely interested in contemporary art and science.

You can see more photos from the exhibition here!

Date: 21st of January – 29th of February 2012

Place: Gerðarsafn, Hamraborg 4, Kópavogur

Artists: Anna Hallin, Birgir Snæbjörn Birgisson, Bjarni Hinriksson, Davíð Örn Halldórsson, Erró, Finnbogi Pétursson, Gabríela Friðriksdóttir, Guðrún Vera Hjartardóttir, Helga Þórsdóttir, Hugleikur Dagsson, Inga María Brynjarsdóttir, Jóhann Ludwig Torfason, Jón Gunnar Árnason, Markmið, Olga Bergmann, Ólöf Nordal, Páll Thayer, Sara Björnsdóttir, Sigurður Örlygsson and Valgerður Guðlaugsdóttir

Curators: Helgi Hjaltalín Eyjólfsson and Úlfhildur Dagsdóttir

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Filed under Art, Design, Group exhibit, Reykjavík, Science

VÄGGER

On-going: 28th of January – 26th of February 2012, Norræna húsið (Reykjavik)

In recent years there has been an increasing interest in a certain form of art, that is marking urban settings across the world and has even developed a specific sub-culture. In next few weeks Konsthopp is going to attract special attention to this kind of art — in other words — street art.

But what is street art? As most art forms, there is no simple definition of street art. The following definition is taken from Art Radar Asia:

It is an amorphous beast encompassing art which is found in or inspired by the urban environment. With anti-capitalist and rebellious undertones, it is a democratic form of popular public art probably best understood by seeing it in situ. It is not limited to the gallery nor easily collected or possessed by those who may turn art into a trophy. Considered by some a nuisance, for others street art is a tool for communicating views of dissent, asking difficult questions and expressing political concerns.

— Art Radar Asia, 21st of January 2012

Wall work by Gebes, Örn Tönsberg and Andrea

Art work by Ólafur Guðmundsson

Art work by Ólafur Guðmundsson

“Vägger” is a group exhibition of nine artists which links together two generations of street artists in Reykjavík along with a street artist from Denmark.

Street art exhibitions, specially in traditional exhibition space (“the white box”) have been up to this point — a quite rare sight in the Icelandic visual art scene. This is the third exhibition which Muses.is represents but the gallery was launched last year. According to the gallery the aim of the exhibition is; to reflect the development of last years and to show how street art has gone into traditional exhibition space with appropriate adjustments.

And for the brave ones, Muses.is have already started an online auction for the artworks from the exhibition. The prices are decided by the artists.

Date: 28th of January – 26th of February 2012

Artists: Andrea Helgadóttir, Björn Árnason, Gebes, Margeir Dire Sigurðarson, Orri, Ólafur Guðmundsson, Skúli Árnason, Þorsteinn Davíðsson and Örn Tönsberg

Place: Norræna húsið, Sturlugötu 5, Reykjavik

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Filed under Graffiti, Group exhibit, Konsthopp, Reykjavík, Street Art, Uncategorized, Young Art