Category Archives: Group exhibit

“CURATOR WILL ALWAYS PLAY AN IMPORTANT ROLE”

— Interview with Alexander Jean Edvard le Sage de Fontenay (Iceland)

When did you start curating? Tell us something about your educational background?

During my last couple of years in highschool (Menntaskólinn við Hamrahlíð) I attended numerous of art history classes and art classes. I had an especially inspirational art teacher that year, Louise Hazell A Harris, and I believe I am lucky that she has taught me. The first art show were I was directly involved in the planning, was held on my graduating year. It was an exhibition of her student’s works from one of her classes, which I went to as well. At her request, I helped the teacher promote it in my school, gather art pieces and I even made a flyer.

For me, the ball actually only started rolling for me quite recently. After I began studying Art History at The University of Iceland I got involved in a number of things. I started writing for the school paper (Stúdentablaðið), helped plan events for students studying art history and last but not least, opened a gallery with a few of my fellow students, called Artíma gallery. The reason we went into doing this was in our opinion a lack of practical courses which are available for art history students. This way we get to exercise our curatorial skills.

Our first exhibition opened in October last year (2011). I have been involved in two shows so far. The first one being a group exhibition of works by 14 artists from The Iceland Academy Of Arts. The second exhibition was called S/H/91-93 and was also a group exhibition of ten black & white works by ten artists who all study primary art education.

What is the artistic field of your curatorial practice?

I enjoy making art myself. I guess the artistic field of my curatorial practice is having a say in what art pieces are ultimately selected by the artists, arranging the pieces to ensure that the right mood is achieved in the exhibition space and also helping the artist find the best suitable way for his works to be presented.

Is there a difference in curating different field of arts, etc. paintings, videos, interactive works or a piece of net art?

Of course. Each medium has a mind of it’s own. The best exhibitions in my opinion, are those that include works of different mediums. And where the art pieces are arranged according to the nature of each exhibition space. In S/H/91-93 I had a few installations and a number of wall based works. I nurtured the artists needs while also filling the space accordingly, to create diversity. I tried to create a contrast with the wall-based art and used the installations in between to maintain balance.

From S/H/91-93. #1. “Án titils” by Magnús Ingvar Ágústsson #2. “Út fyrir rammann” by Krista Alexandersdóttir #3. “Undir smásjá” by Sólveig Eir Steward #4. “Eðlislega óeðlislægt” by Kristín Þorláksdóttir

What kind of qualities do you think a curator should have?

I think a curator should be personable and friendly. It is important for him to have a good relationship with the artist (or artists). He should be able to keep cool at all times. He should do little things like bring a pizza when those finishing touches are being added the night before opening a show.  While he should be friendly he should have leader skills and determination. A lot of things may be riding on a show. But regardless if the show is a success or not, the artist (or artists) should have confidence in the curator.

Do you think that new and digital media used in contemporary art has brought new aspects to arts and curating? Yes or no, explain why?

Internet art has been around since the mid 1990s. Since then it has evolved and so has, obviously, all technology. There was a “revolution” in digital video, making it easier for more artists to work with video. So that’s a definite: Yes.

In times of “You Tube” and the Internet, do you think a curator is still needed?

Yes. I think the curator will always play an important role in the art world. Websites such as Youtube, Vimeo, Flickr, Deviant art, Tumblr to name a few, have made it a lot easier for artists to promote themselves. It has also helped a lot of people find what they’re looking for and to discover new things. This does not make a curator less needed. I believe that just like people won’t stop talking to their friends in real life (offline) they won’t stop going to galleries and museums. Because seeing a work of art online is never the same thing as seeing it face-to-face as a part of an exhibition. Period.

What are your curatorial plans for the future? What are your personal wishes, hopes and perspectives in curating?

In April I will be curating an art show in Artíma gallery. It’s going to be the collected works of a couple of vivacious girls. They have shown a lot of potential. One of them is studying fine arts at The Iceland Academy of Arts and the other is in Reykjavik School of Visual Art. It is going to be collaborative work and some independent work from both of them. Video art, a few sculptures and I’m pretty sure there will be some wall-based art as well. I’m excited about that. In June there will hopefully be a big group exhibition to welcome the summer. There has been a discussion of collaborating with another student gallery, run by the fine arts department at The Iceland Academy of Arts. I would like to be part of that.

My wish is that future art galleries that are in similar scale as Artíma won’t have a hard time gathering funding. Unfortunately, today it is quite a task for galleries (even bigger ones than Artíma) to do this. Me and many of my fellow students are in agreement that for art to flourish “the little guys” have to be given some air to breathe.

Curators should be able to work completely hand-in-hand with artists. This is THEIR world. Artists are not supposed to be scared of consulting or collaborating with artist and vice versa.

What is the future of professional curating from your point of view?

Art history as we know it began in the 19th century. The University Of Iceland began offering art history courses less than a decade ago. In just that time a lot has happened. Curators have gotten more attention in Iceland. I believe things will only get better. In times of lessened funds towards the strengthening of artistic practice, I think interest in art and art history will thrive. As long as people keep working hard for what they believe in and others keep showing their support. Lengi lifi listfræðin! (e. long live art history).

From S/H/91-93. #1. “Triptych” by Valdemar Árni Guðmundsson #2. “Femme Individuelle” by Dýrfinna Benita Garðarsdóttir #3. “Lord Donald is a Pale Horse” by Eysteinn Þórðarson #4. “Undir smásjá” by Sólveig Eir Steward

Photographs by Fritz Hendrik Berndsen IV

Alexander Jean Edvard le Sage de Fontenay (1991) is an art history student at University of Iceland. Despite young age, Alexander is already taking his first steps as a curator. He is a member of Artíma gallerí, a curator run gallery in Reykajvik, managed by students of The University of Iceland. Alexander has been involved in two exhibition in the gallery so far, but Konsthopp first met him at the “S/H/91-93” where he curated ten black & white works by equally many artists. He will next be curating an exhibition at the gallery in April. We are already looking forward to keep an eye on this fireball in the future.

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Filed under Curator, Curator Talk, Digital Art, Drawings, Group exhibit, Installation, Konsthopp, Multimedia, Uncategorized, Video Art, Young Art

PHOTOGRAPHS OF THE YEAR

Vernissage: 3rd of March 2012, Gerðarsafn (Kópavogur)

Press photos should reflect the situation in every society at any given time. That’s why I’m always a bit excited when the “Press photo of the year award” in Iceland is announced but Kópavogur art museum (Gerðarsafn) annually houses the event.

According to the selected committee, these pictures stood out in certain categories last year.

Category: “Daily Life” / Eyþór Árnason

Category: “Magazine photo of the year” / Kristinn Magnússon

Category: “Portrait picture of the year” / Rakel Ósk Sigurðardóttir

Category: “Sport photo of the year” / Kristinn Magnússon

Photographs belong to the photographers

For society critics and other thinkers it can be curious to compare the emphasis and trends in press photography between nations. I went to the “Swedish press photo award” last year in Stockholm and now this year in Iceland. At first sight, these two closely related countries seems to have almost nothing in common when it comes to media’s photo coverage. The Swedish press photos mirrors multicultural society, while the geographical isolation of Iceland seems to affect the Icelanders approach to press photography — sometimes in a very positive way.

Anyhow, I have to admit that I’m quite impressed how many Icelandic photographers have gained reputation and respect internationally — especially since most photographers of this country have to travel abroad to get their education. Examples of those includes the young fashion photographers, Saga Sig and Silja Magg and of course — the world known (and self-taught) documentary photographer Rax.

Don´t miss this years “Photograph of the year” in Sweden. The exhibition will be opened the 31st of March in Galleri Kontrast, Stockholm.

Date: 3rd of March – 7th of April 2012

Photographers: Various

Place: Gerðarsafn, Hamraborg 4, Kópavogur

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Filed under Art, Artist books, Digital Art, Group exhibit, Konsthopp, Media, Multimedia, Photography, Reykjavík, Uncategorized

SÆBORGIN: KYNJAVERUR OG ÓKINDUR

On-going: 21st of January – 29th of February 2012, Gerðarsafn (Kópavogur)

One of the most interesting exhibition I have seen this year in Iceland is now running in Gerðarsafn.

Photographs by Konsthopp

With a mixture of art and science this exhibition should attract technic nerds, animators, amateurs of prosthetics technology, reformists and of course anyone who is genuinely interested in contemporary art and science.

You can see more photos from the exhibition here!

Date: 21st of January – 29th of February 2012

Place: Gerðarsafn, Hamraborg 4, Kópavogur

Artists: Anna Hallin, Birgir Snæbjörn Birgisson, Bjarni Hinriksson, Davíð Örn Halldórsson, Erró, Finnbogi Pétursson, Gabríela Friðriksdóttir, Guðrún Vera Hjartardóttir, Helga Þórsdóttir, Hugleikur Dagsson, Inga María Brynjarsdóttir, Jóhann Ludwig Torfason, Jón Gunnar Árnason, Markmið, Olga Bergmann, Ólöf Nordal, Páll Thayer, Sara Björnsdóttir, Sigurður Örlygsson and Valgerður Guðlaugsdóttir

Curators: Helgi Hjaltalín Eyjólfsson and Úlfhildur Dagsdóttir

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Filed under Art, Design, Group exhibit, Reykjavík, Science

VÄGGER

On-going: 28th of January – 26th of February 2012, Norræna húsið (Reykjavik)

In recent years there has been an increasing interest in a certain form of art, that is marking urban settings across the world and has even developed a specific sub-culture. In next few weeks Konsthopp is going to attract special attention to this kind of art — in other words — street art.

But what is street art? As most art forms, there is no simple definition of street art. The following definition is taken from Art Radar Asia:

It is an amorphous beast encompassing art which is found in or inspired by the urban environment. With anti-capitalist and rebellious undertones, it is a democratic form of popular public art probably best understood by seeing it in situ. It is not limited to the gallery nor easily collected or possessed by those who may turn art into a trophy. Considered by some a nuisance, for others street art is a tool for communicating views of dissent, asking difficult questions and expressing political concerns.

— Art Radar Asia, 21st of January 2012

Wall work by Gebes, Örn Tönsberg and Andrea

Art work by Ólafur Guðmundsson

Art work by Ólafur Guðmundsson

“Vägger” is a group exhibition of nine artists which links together two generations of street artists in Reykjavík along with a street artist from Denmark.

Street art exhibitions, specially in traditional exhibition space (“the white box”) have been up to this point — a quite rare sight in the Icelandic visual art scene. This is the third exhibition which Muses.is represents but the gallery was launched last year. According to the gallery the aim of the exhibition is; to reflect the development of last years and to show how street art has gone into traditional exhibition space with appropriate adjustments.

And for the brave ones, Muses.is have already started an online auction for the artworks from the exhibition. The prices are decided by the artists.

Date: 28th of January – 26th of February 2012

Artists: Andrea Helgadóttir, Björn Árnason, Gebes, Margeir Dire Sigurðarson, Orri, Ólafur Guðmundsson, Skúli Árnason, Þorsteinn Davíðsson and Örn Tönsberg

Place: Norræna húsið, Sturlugötu 5, Reykjavik

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Filed under Graffiti, Group exhibit, Konsthopp, Reykjavík, Street Art, Uncategorized, Young Art

“BAKOM RUBRIKERNA”

On-going: 21st of January – 19th of February 2012, Galleri Kontrast (Stockholm)

Each morning I read through the headlines of the newspaper. Some articles interest me and are worth my attention, others not.  Most people have the same experience, we quickly riffle through the newspaper, read short articles and notes but most of the time it’s already a lost memory. Easy to forget.

“Bakom rubrikerna” (“Behind the headlines”) is a final project of seventeen photostudents at the Nordens Fotoskola. Seventeen stories are told and inspired by equally many newsarticles that the studenst have picked out themselves. Through their photographs, they tell us things that we wouldn’t be able to find otherwise in our newspaper. It is interesting to see what they’ve found and how they were inspired to explore people’s stories in order to show what has been hiding behind the headlines.

“Aina & Tage” / Photoseries by Rebecka Uhlin

“Kängorna på marken” / Photoseries by Angelica Sander

“Mellanåringar” / Photoseries by Evelina Carborn

“Alldeles ny” / Photoseries by Anna Surma

“Jag vill inte att du blir ensam” / Film by Robin Haldert

Photographs taken by Konsthopp

The real “Stockholmare” ; mothers with their newborn babies; swedish cheerleaders ; senior home; teenage spirits ; five decades of marriage ; ex-relationships ; friendships ;  soldiers in Afghanistan; asylum seekers …

The photographs are beautiful but it’s the stories behind each series that really brings them to life. Stories of people — relationships — destinies. Stories that are complicated and show a whole rainbow of emotions (see all the photographs here).

It’s really impressive how intimate and personal some of the projects are. It can’t be easy to let go of your own ego and gain that trust, which is needed to be able tell another person’s story — or in some cases — to tell your own story.

The students are brave and should be proud of their work — each headline was worth to be explored and different stories to be told. There is a soul and a heart in it.

And that is what I call art!

Date: 21st of January – 19th of February 2012

Artists: Andreas Nilsson, Angelica Zander, Anna Ekros, Anna Surma, Evelina Carborn, Gustav Hugosson, Karl Henrik Edlund, Katja Annola, Kenny Bengtsson, Lisa Irvall, Ola Håkansson, Rebecka Uhlin, Robin Haldert, Samuel Unéus, Sara Johari, Sebastian Waldenby, Viktor Johansson

Place: Galleri Kontrast, Hornsgatan 8, Stockholm

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Filed under Group exhibit, Konsthopp, Photography, Political Art, Stockholm

THE DEMAND IS HIGHER THAN EVER

Curator talk: Marín Björt Valtýsdóttir (Iceland)

When did you start curating? Tell us something about your educational background?

My first experience with curating was back in high school, setting up our graduation art exhibition. We were many and had very different backgrounds, so it was quite a task putting up the show. However, we did work and the outcome was better than we had hoped fore! As for further curating for my behalf, there haven’t been many opportunities. Curating is not a part of our program in the arts department of University of Iceland, the classes that teach the subject are small classes and fill up quickly so it is difficult to get in them, so going abroad is the only option to become a professional curator. But since we do know what curating is and we are curious about it a student gallery was opened fall of 2011. The gallery, which is called Artíma Gallerí, is giving us opportunity to try out curating and finding other people that are interested in the subject of curating and running a gallery.

What is the artistic field of your curatorial practice?

Usually I deal with 2d artworks like paintings or drawings. It was interesting when we decided to include one of Hekla Björt Helgadóttir’s pieces, which consisted of a lamp, broken plates and a stone heart, in the 3rd show of Artíma Gallerí. Once we started planning, it turned out that the piece would work better as an installation using the afforded space in the gallery in a different way than we first envisioned.

Is there a difference in curating different field of arts, etc. paintings, videos, interactive works or a piece of net art?

In retrospect it didn’t seem to matter much to me in which form or medium the artworks were but of course sooner or later practical matters will need to be addressed. In an ideal situation, the curator takes away the burden from the artist, of matching the artworks to an audience in a meaningful way. In reality this often results in a very close collaboration between the curator and the artist, which can be slightly less glamorous. Hammering nails into the wall or holding the ladder while attaching support strings.

From Artíma #3, work by Hekla Björt Helgasóttir, curated by Marín Björt Valtýsdóttir. Photos/Konsthopp

What kind of qualities do you think a curator should have?

Curating is a broad field of work, and every show is different. I think the artist makes the biggest difference in putting up an exhibition and how fluently it goes. When the collaboration between the artist and the curator is good, magic can happen.

A good curator sees the needs of the artist and the exhibition and does what it takes to combine it in to an interesting exhibition. Flexibility and diplomacy is important, as are social and communication skills since a big part of putting up an exhibition is working with other people and finding common grounds to work from. A curator is also a facilitator, concerning herself with practical matters.

Do you think that new and digital media used in contemporary art has brought new aspects to arts and curating? Yes or no, explain why?

Digital media is very fascinating because it can be very vivid and alive. Due to my young age I cannot say much about the effects it has had on curating since digital media used as an art form is older than I am. What I can tell is that digital media and interactive works are becoming more and more popular in the museum world so the medium is marking its place in the ‘traditional’ art world.

In times of “You Tube” and the Internet, do you think a curator is still needed?

I don’t see the Internet as having much effect on curating, as in making curating unnecessary. Museums and galleries are becoming more and more popular each year and new art fairs seem to be popping up all over the world, so the demand for a curator, if anything, is higher than ever. Youtube creates an abundance of information; years worth of video are uploaded daily on Youtube alone. My partner pointed out to me that curating is engaged in actively by the online community. People have created channels or blogs with little or no original content, consisting of other people’s artworks both collecting and connecting them, cross media.

What are your curatorial plans for the future? What are your personal wishes, hopes and perspectives in curating?

Curating is a very interesting field of work, it offers you an exciting environment to work in, where you get to know artists and their work in a close and remarkable way. I hope to do more curating in the future since I find it an enjoyable experience. If I were to further my studies in curating, I would have to go abroad and at the moment I have no plans, I would be lying though to say that I haven’t looked into it.

What is the future of professional curating from your point of view?

Curating is a profession that seems to be on the rise. With more and more museums bursting up and art fairs existing in every country I think the field of curating is going to bloom in the coming years.

From Artíma #3, work by Hekla Björt Helgasóttir, curated by Marín Björt Valtýsdóttir. Photo/Konsthopp

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Filed under Art, Art festival, Collage/Clip Art, Conversation, Digital Art, Group exhibit, Installation, Konsthopp, Media, Paintings, Reykjavík, Uncategorized, Visual Art

(Ó)SÝN

On-going: 19th of November 2011 – 8th of January 2012, Gerðarsafn (Kópavogur)

The cover of the 2nd issue of Endemi

Endemi is a new magazine covering Icelandic contemporary art, with a special focus on Icelandic female artists. Affairs on equal rights has been the magazine focal point from the start. The main goal of the editors policy is to make art more accessible to the public and to work towards a more gender-balanced media coverage of art in Iceland.

To celebrate the second issue of the magazine, a group exhibition was recently launched at Gerðarsafn — a proper place for the editors policy — but the museum is dedicated to Gerður Helgadóttir, one of the most prominent Icelandic female artist of the 20th century. In the exhibition (Ó)sýn, fourteen artists were chosen to display their work, twelve women and three men. This unequal gender proportion is supposed to reflect — conversely — the usual 70/30% (70 male /30 female) gender imbalance in management of corporations, state power and the art world in Western countries.

From the exhibition (Ó)sýn

A photograph by Anna Líndal

A painting by Jóhanna Kristbjörg Sigurðardóttir

I´m already looking forward to see the third issue of Endemi but the magazine is for sale in all major bookstores in Iceland. Personally, I think the magazine is a great and very needed addition to the limited media coverage on contemporary art in Iceland.

Thanks for us!

Photographs by Konsthopp

Date: 19th of November 2011 – 8th of January 2012

Curators: Ragnhildur Jóhannsdóttir and Selma Hreggviðsdóttir

Artists: Anna Líndal, Ásta Ólafsdóttir, Guðrún Hrönn Ragnarsdóttir, Eva Ísleifsdóttir, Katrín Sigurðardóttir, Elín Hansdóttir, Þorvaldur Jónsson, Sara Björnsson, Gjörningarklúbburinn, Greg Barret, Birgir Snæbjörn Birgisson and Jóhanna Kristbjörg Sigurðardóttir

Place: Gerðarsafn, Hamraborg 4, Kópavogur

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DECADE OF FASHION

Closed: 13th of November 2011, Gerðarsafn (Kópavogur)

And more about fashion.

Iceland´s fashion designers have been flourishing ever since the economy crashed in 2008. The broken economy led to lower rents on Laugarvegur, the capital´s most known shopping street, as well as our national devil (the Icelandic currency króna) sided against young designers to move abroad. Once the money disappeared, the fashion industry took on new life. Additionally, many design shops popped up in the city center, attracting both tourists and locals.

Sonja Bent

Mundi

Skaparinn

Sock by Sonja Bent

Photographs by Konsthopp

The exhibition was extensive and featured some of today´s best Icelandic fashion design. The Icelandic Fashion Council held the exhibition but the organization recently celebrated their tenth anniversary.

And the promise of Icelandic design keeps on rising…

Date: 8th of October – 13th of November 2011

Designers: Áróra, Ásta Creative Clothes, Farmers Market, Birna, Lúka Art & Design, Skaparinn, Shadow Creatures, ELM, Kurl Projekt, Eva María Árnadóttir, Eygló, Go with Jan, MUNDI, Gust, Guðmundur Jörundsson, Andersen & Lauth, Hanna Felting, Ziska, Ígló, KronKron, IBA-The Indian in Me, Jbj design, Kalda, REY, Forynja, Lykkjufall, Sonja Bent, Path of Love, Sunbird, Thelma, Spaksmannsspjarir, Eight of Hearts, Vera and Sruli Recht.

Place: Gerðarsafn, Hamraborg 4, Kópavogur

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Filed under Artist Talk, Conversation, Design, Group exhibit, Konsthopp, Reykjavík, Textile Art, Uncategorized

HAMSKIPTI

Vernissage: 29th of October 2011, Hafnarborg (Hafnarfjörður)

I want to introduce you to some of Iceland’s most promising artists.
Saga Sig; a London-based fashion photographer (and a world known photo blogger) and Hildur Yeoman; a fashion designer and illustrator. For you who haven´t heard of them, let´s go on a journey — a visual journey filled with dreams and fairy tales.

Photographs by Konsthopp

The young and talented team has been joining forces for the last couple of years, creating mystical and adventurous worlds together. Their previous work includes mixing videos and photographs with illustration and installation, where fashion is usually the focal point.
About their previous collaboration in the acclaimed Garden of Enchantment at Kling & Bang last year, Saga Sig said:
“We combined our forces, my photography and her illustrations to create a magical world where our own tales inspired by greek mythology and russian fairy tales are combined in an icelandic winter wonderland”.
Saga Sig and Hildur Yeoman recently participated in The Nordic Fashion Biennale in Seattle. The highlight of the Biennale was an exhibition, Looking Back to Find our Future, curated by a New York-based Icelandic artist, Hrafnhildur Arnardottir. The show included fashion and jewelry from Denmark, the Faroe Islands, Finland, Greenland, Iceland, Sweden, and Norway…
… and talking about a highlight, Hamskipti (Metamorphosis) was no ordinary show. The colourful crowd didn´t spoil the eminent ensemble either. And it must be admitted that it was far more fashionable than we are ever used to on “traditional” art openings.
Date: 29th of October – 30th of December 2011
Artists: Saga Sig and Hildur Yeoman
Place: Hanfnarborg, Strandgata 34, Hafnarfjörður

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Filed under Art, Artist Talk, Conversation, Digital Art, Drawings, Group exhibit, Illustrations, Installation, Konsthopp, Media, Photography, Reykjavík, Uncategorized, Video Art, Visual Art

“NO ARTIFICIAL COLOURS”

Vernissage: 9th of November 2011, Group 11-11/ Young Art (Stockholm)

Have you ever tasted a rainbow-colored hot dogs? 

“Hot dogs 1”. Work by Clara Hellncreutz

Clara Hallencreutz gives you a colorful taste of art and food in her latest photo project “No Artificial Coulours”.

According to the artist, the project is a suggestive series of photographs displaying the daily food we eat — alluding to the manipulation of all kinds of additives and genetics put in our nourishment. The images are not meant to be corrective or take a position, but to ask questions of the one looking at them.

Why is the environment, design and color of such a great importance when we eat? Is the factor of “identifying the food” safe or boring? Does the manipulation bring about opportunities or horror scenarios that are hard to control?

“Ceci n’est pas green/yellow”. Work by Clara Hallencreutz

I don’t know about you, but I’ve never tasted a blue — or in that matter yellow, green, purple & red — hot-dog before. And I’m not really sure if I would want to do that. Just looking at the photographs, the thought of it felt kind of silly.

At the same time, in some weird — maybe a bit silly — way, the photographs and the food attracted me, there was some sort of an excitement and fun about it that made me even more curious.

Still and all it kept popping up in my head — how far can we actually go in making our food look attractive and ready to consume…?

Is the gold “menu” the future of McDonald’s? Work by Clara Hallencreutz

Photographs by Konsthopp

Clara Hallencreutz (1985) completed her Bachelor of Photography at Griffith University (Brisbane, Australia) in 2009. Her photography has been exhibited around Australia, Beijing and Jinan. She is currently displaying part of her work in Stockholm, both at Bistro Berns and the Young Art gallery (as a part of the exhibition GROUP 11-11).

To see more photos from the night, click here

Artists: Clara Hallencreutz with Group 11-11 (Philipp Gallon, Malin Larsson & Josef Jägnefält)

Date: 9th – 27th of November 2011

Place: Young Art, Artillerigatan 6, Stockholm

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Filed under Group exhibit, Konsthopp, Paintings, Photography, Stockholm, Uncategorized, Young Art