Category Archives: Sound Art

WHERE DO WE GO FROM HERE?

Final words: The Icelandic Love Corporation

It’s the last day of June and time to move on. Before we continue onto the summer — keeping a lower profile on the country side — we are wrapping up the “flavor of the month“, closing June with an artistic work that touches upon existential and political issues, which is theatrically staged with a humorous angle — in a peculiar fusion of realism and surrealism…

Happy summer everyone!

The Icelandic Love Corporation — Eirún Sigurðardóttir, Jóní Jónsdóttir, Sigrún Hrólfsdóttir and Dóra Ísleifsdóttir (who left the group in 2001) — met in Reykjavík, at the Icelandic College of Arts and Crafts. Their first big performance was “The Kiss”, featuring the artists kissing and was broadcasted on national TV in 1996.

The Kiss / Photo taken from ICL’s homepage

A kiss — they say — that was a little bit longer than a friends kiss but a little bit shorter than a lover’s kiss. In the end of the performance one of the artists kissed the camera lens and in the meantime, sent a kiss to every home in the whole country.

“With this performance we were trying to spread love and good feelings,” Sigrún says (in Grapewine 2007).

And since then — since that first kiss — the mission of the group has only expanded in line with their steadily growing career.

Women good enough to eat / Photo taken from ILC’s homepage

To The Icelandic Love Corporation, there are no rules — anything goes and nothing is irrelevant. Even though spreading love and good feeling is a part of their performances, The Icelandic Love Corporation has never been afraid to go all the way. Humour, femininity and carelessness is mixed with political thoughts and serious topics in their work, which is mostly performative — depending on time, place and “had-to-be-there” moments.  The group is enigmatic and their vibrant, life affirming work is both transient and anonymous. It’s not resistant to pin-pointing or analysing — and trying to do so is rather futile. Their work is honest — and refreshing — with a serious undertone that isn’t unwieldy. As is written in an interview with the group in the SiouxWire Annex from 2006:

“As a whole, their body of work is like an ornate diary, a window into their own personal journeys with the most incredible, enlightening outlook”.

“Where do we go from here?” / Photographer: Páll Stefánsson

Through performances and other mediums (including installations, prints, textile, sculptures, poetry, photography and videos), the group works to breakdown the distance between art and audience, and their projects often result in participatory events or public offerings. In one of their latest collaboration with Lilith Performance Studio in Malmö, the group created — in a living web of 5000 nylon pantyhose — a singular visual experience “Think Less, Feel more” that worked on irrational levels of the thinking process. The performance had its starting point in the visible and invisible contacts between people — conveying experiences of control and lack of control, conflict, sensitivity and elasticity …

… taking the performance artform just a one step further.

Think Less – Feel more / Photo taken from Lilith Performance Studio

The Icelandic Love Corporation (Gjörningaklúbburinn) was established by four Icelandic women in 1996 and since then, the group has gained a reputation both in Iceland and abroad. The fourth member (Dóra Ísleifsdóttir) left the group in 2001 but the three remaining members; Eirún Sigurðardóttir (1971), Jóní Jónsdóttir (1971) and Sigrún Hrólfsdóttir (1973), have kept on making artwork together, tour the world and surprise both audience and bypassers with innovative performances and lasting by-products including installations, sculptures, prints, textile, photographs, poetry and videos. Believing in the power of collaboration, the ILC’s history counts more than 200 exhibitions, as they’ve performed in small galleries and large museums, collaborated with renowned artists and musicians (f.ex. Björk) and invaded public spaces in major cities across the world. Their work can be found found in numerous public and private collections. 


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Filed under Art, Choreography, Documentary, Iceland, Installation, Live art, Media, Music, Performance, Photography, Political Art, Print, Reykjavík, Sculptures, Sociopolitical art, Sound Art, Textile Art, Video Art, Visual Art

“MOMENTS OF ART AND LIFE”

Artist talk: Erla Silfá Þorgrímsdóttir (Iceland/Norway)

Since 2010 she has been working like a “spy”, recording found conversation in public spaces.

“In my mind the changing room became the scenario of the play Waiting for Godot. The trivial dialogue suddenly revealed itself to me and appeared as important. In that second it felt like the dialogue could tell me more about my own existence than the words of the greatest philosophers. Not necessarily by what was spoken, but the feeling it gave me of everyday life. The importance of the so-called trivial, while we are waiting to get some answers on our own existence”

“I can’t hear my eyes” by Erla Silfá Þorgrímsdóttir

Erla Silfá Þorgrímsdóttir got the first idea for her project “I can’t hear my eyes” as she was caught up between other’s people conversation in the changing room at her gym. Since then she has been paying attention to the subjective and the small voices around her in everyday life as she is interested in those voices that are usually not heard and not considered of big importance.

Erla Silfá might not be a much of a talker, but she is definitely a “hell of a listener!” Be sure not to miss out on her final exhibition — and the truth about our public conversations – at Konstfack in May this year.

Read our latest artist talk with Erla Silfá Þorgrímsdóttir here.

Photograph belong to Erla Silfá Þorgrímsdóttir

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Filed under Art, Artist Talk, Fine Art, Sound Art, Stockholm, Young Art

“EVER CHANGING TRAGICOMEDY”

Artist talk: Monika Fryčová (Czech Republic)

It´s my belief that foreigners add colour to the life of Nordic communities. Not only literally — by the meaning of the word of colour — but rather culturally. The globalization has brought to us e.g. new knowledge, customs, ideas, gourmet food and intercultural exchanges in both music and art.

A short while ago, I met Monika Fryčová at her exhibition Perpeetum Mobile at Kling & Bang. Suddenly, the globalization became very vivid — almost touchable. There we stood, two women from different nations, wearing furs from east and west, talking about art together in English — with most regard to the east-european car, which was moved from Berlin to Reykjavik, not so long ago.

Here is a part of Monika Fryčová artist statement:

Monika Fryčová works with any sort of media and techniques. She frequently deals with untranslatable experiences, trying to per/form under their own rhythms…

…She has been exploring intercultural issues and border culture, exotic minorities and experimental languages. In recent years she has been focussed on Iceland due to its intense confrontations of the elements and unique meetings.

She avoids repeating herself.  

Since we started this blog in April, we have interviewed inspirational artists from China, Mexico, Greece, Denmark, Peru, Sweden, Iceland and now — The Czech Republic.  Living permanently or temporarily in Nordic countries they all have in common to significantly stimulate our cultural communities and art experiences.

We are proud to present our latest and last artist talk of 2011.

Please welcome Monika Fryčová!

QuengKong / performance by Monika Fryčová, 2011 (Penestanan, Bali)

Photograph belong to Monika Fryčová

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Filed under Art, Artist Talk, Conversation, Installation, Konsthopp, Multimedia, Photography, Political Art, Reykjavík, Sculptures, Solo exhibit, Sound Art, Uncategorized, Video Art, Visual Art

PERPEETUM MOBILE

Date: 19th of November – 18th of December 2011, Kling & Bang (Reykjavik)

I was born to be a traveler. And like most other travelers — I love to meet people who follow their traveler hearts.

Monika Frycova uses travels as an art form. To get between places she travels around on a car, which is in fact one of the weirdest car I have ever seen — an old red-coloured Trabant.

And she makes a clear difference between being a traveler and a tourist:

“A tourist follows a guide but a traveler doesn’t have any map. It´s like a training. You train yourself to go as far as possible without any limitation.” Djöflaeyjan, 29th of November 2011. You can see the whole interview in English here

An installation by Monika Fricova / Kling & Bang 2011

Monika Frycova is a Czech audiovisual artist, performer and a writer that used to study in Iceland and still spends a lot of time there. In Perpetuum Mobile, the artist exhibit photos and videos from her journeys around the world, accompanied by composition. To understand the artist statement more deeply, let´s quote to her words in the exhibition catalogue.

“In this evolution of weaving my personal stories and using improvisation as a creative tool, I haven´t followed any version or model. My investigation focuses on different items — human experiences, the most.” Monika Frycova, Perpetuum Mobile exhibition catalogue, Kling & Bang, 2011.

The historical “Trabant” can now be seen on Hverfisgata

Photographs by Konsthopp

The artist´s journey on the Trabant started in a small village in Czech Republic in 2005. The car, which looks more or less like a sculpture, hasn´t been that easy to travel around in. As a matter of fact, Monika gets arrested all the time for just driving it. Today, she and her Trabant have travelled all the way from Berlin to Iceland, where it is now placed temporarily on Hverfisgata 42, in front of Kling & Bang gallery.

Date: 19th of November – 18th of December 2011, Kling & Bang (Reykjavik)

Artist: Monika Frycova

Place: Kling & Bang, Hverfisgata 42, Reykjavik

Opening hours: Thursday – Sunday, 14.00 – 16.00

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Filed under Art, Installation, Konsthopp, Multimedia, Photography, Political Art, Reykjavík, Sculptures, Solo exhibit, Sound Art, Uncategorized, Video Art, Visual Art

DO NOT ENJOY ART

The day of none-art: 1st of November 2011 (Reykjavik)

THE FIFTEEN COMMANDMENTS

1. Do not go to museums, design museums or galleries that holds any art works.

2. Do not look at art works, including paintings, photographs, sculptures and installations — whether it is inside or outside.

3. Do not go to concerts.

4. Do not listen to music — either from CD´s, vinyl records, cassettes, digital music players or smart phones (ringtones included).

5. Do not play video games with graphic images.

6. Do not go to dance performances.

7. Do not read novels, poetry or any other text that might be considered literature.

8. Do not go to theaters.

9. Do not watch a film — neither in a cinema, nor in computer, television or at any other screen.

10. If any kind of artwork is displayed on television; f. ex. in the news or in some advertising — you should close your eyes or look away.

11. If you hear music on the television or in the radio — you should turn it down.

12. Do not look at buildings which are designed by architects.

13. Do not watch or walk in gardens which are designed by landscape architects.

14. Do not watch or wear clothing by fashion designers.

15. Do not do anything or enjoy anything that could be interpreted as art or have artistic value, including work of dancers, designers, actors, artists, writers and musicians.

This text is translated by Konsthopp from the Sím homepage (The association of Icelandic visual artists).

Could you live without art?

A society without art is bound to be truly poor.

Photograph by Konsthopp

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REMAKE, REBUILD AND RENEW

ANTI-Contemporary art festival:

29th of September – 2nd of October 2011 (Kuopio)

Finland was the last destination on our first alternative art tour around Scandinavia. Instead of inhaling the capital, we went straight to Kuopio – a smaller city on the east coast, where the 10th anniversary of ANTI- festival was celebrated. The theme of this year’s festival was; REMAKE, REBUILD and RENEW.

“The city center of Kuopio is undertaking a great reconstruction”

Since this was my very first time in Finland, I’d been wondering about the country and its people. Who were these Finns and what were they like?

It´s hard to infer about a nation after only staying there for couple of days. But at least I got some hints about the Finnish social behavior;

The standard greeting for Finnish people is a handshake. Hugs and kisses, even on the cheek, are only exchanged between family members and close friends. And the Finnish language. Unfortunately, it lacks a specific word for “please”, so Finns sometimes forget to use it when speaking English, even when they don’t mean to be rude.

And why do I think this is interesting? Simply, because it sounds like Iceland; my country and its people.

“The typical Finn eats a lot of potatoes (and so does the Icelandic’s)”

Over a crisp cool weekend, we got the opportunity to meet some of the world’s best performance artists, party with locals and learn couple of words in the weirdest language on earth.

If you want to see some more photos from Kuopio click here!

Kiitos paljon

“This does not need any further explanation”

Photographs by Konsthopp

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“DEVOURED”

Vernissage: 18th of August 2011, Wetterling (Stockholm)

Thursday was BIG! But before we tell you all about it, there is one more exhibition we want you readers to know about.

Over a week ago we went to an opening night of a young artist from Gothenburg. And since that night, we’ve been thinking about this particular blog entry and how we should actually write about it, in order to genuinely describe our feelings of impression. It doesn’t happen often that we’re out of words, but sometimes —certainly in this case— it does.

One reason for this to happen, might be the consequence of entering an exhibition that from the first second, touches you so deeply that you know it will result in a found and unforgettable memory. Something you really just have to experience yourself, in order to understand.

Another reason might be the fact that an artist creates, in a “simple white gallery”, an absolutely unique world with material as basic as a brown duct tape, bought from the nearest hardware store. Being more specific, it took the artist 6 weeks of preparation, using 3000 rolls of duct tape, equaling 200 km.

“Devoured” – Johnny Boy Eriksson

And who is the person behind this outstanding work? Who created this world made of simple brown duct tape, bought from the hardware store?

Well — we know he’s from Gothenburg. And we know his artistic name is Johnny Boy Eriksson. That’s all.

In the middle of the colorful (and a bit fancy) crowd, we saw a laid-back guy, wearing long shorts and a white t-shirt, with a black cap turning backwards on his head. The name, “Johnny Boy”, looked good on him. He’s a guy from the hood — if you know what I mean.

We’ll end it by quoting a young viewer from the crowd: “This is sick man!”

Respect***

Photographs by Konsthopp

Date: 18th of August – 3rd of September 2011

Artist: Johnny Boy Eriksson

Place: Wetterling gallery, Kungsträdgården 3, Stockholm

Opening hours: Tuesday – Friday, 11.00 – 17.30 ; Saturday, 13.00 – 16.00. Or by appointment.

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