Category Archives: Visual Art

WHAT CAME FIRST? THE WOMAN OR THE EGG?

Solo performance: 14th & 15th of June 2012, CCAP Studios (Stockholm)

“Vulnerability, beauty, innocence. The white and the clean. Eggs on the inside and on the outside. When did I become a woman? When will I become the woman I want to be?” A solo performance on restraining oneself and to be free.

Disa Krosness /  Tove Brunberg. (Translated by Konsthopp) 

Photographs by Disa Krosness & Írena Steindórsdóttir

The performance, What came first? – The woman or the egg? is a study of projected femininity and how it manifests itself in the body. The opening scene starts with a woman — clean, pure — sitting on a chair, dressed in white, red high heals, painting a face on an egg. Spread around her and attached to her spine are the fragile eggs, which she carefully handles and proceeds around with caution. The solo is performed without music or sounds, so Tove’s facial expressions — titters, smiles, eye-contacts — and movements, are powerful and portray a feeling of insecurity, self-consciousness and restrictions. Under the performance, the woman lose her balance, falls and an egg shatters… after that, there is no going back for her…

Tuve Brunberg said this about the process of the project:

 ”It was a partnership that really challenged me as a person, on a private level but also on an artistic level. It has been a deep dive into myself as a person and what is actually important in the job as a dancer. It has been demanding physically as I have been executing expression that I am not accustomed to perform, such as “facial choreography” or mime, and other movements that did force me to push my limits physically and mentally.”

(Translated by Konsthopp)

The idea first came from Disa Krosness (1985), a dancer and choreographer, and is a result of a month-long collaboration between Disa Krosness, Tove Brunberg and Anna Lo Engwald (costume designer) in a residency at CCAP Studios in Stockholm. The whole project is basically no budget but Stockholm City contributed 10 000 for the marketing, costumes and props and CCAP offered free studio. Disa Krosness says that ..” the wish is to put it up on a gallery, where I think it would fit well. I am also seeking ways to make it into a dance film”.

I really hope her wish comes true — and that more people can enjoy this outstanding performance!

Disa Krosness (idea & choreography) is born in 1985 and trained as a dancer at the Schools of Modern Dance in Copenhagen. In the spring of 2012 Disa initiated Friends, with Benefits, a platform to promote cooperation among female dancers. In line with her desire to highlight newly established choreographers and dancers, Disa is involved in organizing the dance festival MOVE TO BE MOVED and has recently started the dance group Lativ Super, were the vision is to raise the dancer and choreographers status in society. 

Contact info: disakrosness@gmail.com

Tove Brunberg (process & presentation) is born in 1986 and has worked as a freelance dancer since she graduated from the Royal Swedish Ballet School (modern line) in 2006. She has produced and participated in performances with the group ches: co, which she helped establish in 2006 and which has performed in various places in Stockholm. Tove has also done her own solos as well as working in sets with Susanne Jaresand, Lotta Melin, Carl Olof Berg, Dorte Olesen, Sebastian Lingserius, Ossi Niskala and SU-EN Butoh Dance Company.

Contact info: tove.brunberg@gmail.com

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Filed under Art, Choreography, Dance, Favourite of the month, Live art, Performance, Political Art, Sociopolitical art, Uncategorized, Visual Art

LIFE CLOCK

Vernissage: 22nd of June 2012, Den Frie Centre of Contemporary Art (Copenhagen)

Every summer, Den Frie Centre of Contemporary Art invites artists to curate an exhibition with a focus on the latest tendencies in contemporary art. This year the art group A Kassen, curates the show and present their own view of interesting art right now, inviting 12 Danish and International artists to take part in the exhibition. The title of the show, Life Clock, is taken from one of the works by French artist Bertrand Planes. The piece consist of a clock that does not record time as normally — in hours and minutes — but instead counts years and age approximated from the average lifespan of a Frenchman. The clock is adjusted so that it’s 54.800 times slower than a normal clock and keeps time with the artists’ actual age. With this simple gesture, Bertrand Planes changes our perception of time from anonymous, collective and perhaps meaningless — to an image of personal vanity and a reminder of the transience of life.

One of Konsthopp’s good friend in Copenhagen, Amir Zainorin, was present at the opening night and took some shots. Enjoy!

Photographs by Amir Zainorin

Date: 23rd of June – 12th of August 2012

Artists: Honey Biba Beckerlee (DK), Julius Von Bismarck (DE) and Julian Charriere (FR/CH), Torben Christensen (DK), Cyprien Gaillard (FR), Robin Gommel (DE), Anna Molska (PL), Simon Dybbroe Møller (DK), Bertrand Planes (FR), Att Poomtangon (TH), Wilfredo Prieto (CU), Troels Sandegaard and Ebbe Stub Wittrup (DK), From The Confected Video Archive of Kling & Bang Gallerí: Hekla Dögg Jónsdóttir, Loji Höskuldsson and Úlfur Grönvold (IS).

Curator: A Kassen art group

Place: Den Frie Centre of Contemporary Art, Oslo Plats 1, Copenhagen


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Filed under Amir Zainorin, Art, Art stroll, Collage/Clip Art, Copenhagen, Group exhibit, Guest blog, Konsthopp, Photography, Sculptures, Visual Art, Workshop visit

FATAL FETISHISM

Online publication: KATALOG (Canada)

“Irony serves as an alibi for a fetish.” (Nathaniel Wing)

Fetish is one of my favorite words in the dictionary. There is something fascinating, disturbing and — well — disgusting about fetishism. My prospects about this perverted phenomenon; often makes me laugh.

And more people seems to be preoccupied by fetish.

The 6th issue of KATALOG — Fetish

A new issue of KATALOG was recently launched. For those who don´t know — Katalog is an e-magazine dedicated to the practice of performances and live arts around the world. The magazine is a free paperless performance publication, published quarterly by the Central Canadian Center for Performance. CCCP’s main aim is to create awareness and document performative and live arts.

Two Icelandic artists; Eva Ísleifsdóttir and Rakel McMahon presents their work in the latest issue.

 

Eva Ísleifsdóttir wrote the following words about her performance; “It´s a sign“:

… Walking around Cork city center with a big traffic symbol on my back. The by-passers offering their help but I politely said no. It was heavy and awkward. The Cul de sac is a traffic symbol that indicates a dead-end street. Using the symbol as a representation of reality, I walked the streets of Cork with a big traffic symbol on my back. Traffic symbols weight a lot in modern society, warning signs, indications, they are directing us, for our own safety. Older civilizations recognized the power of symbols and used them extensively in everything. What if the ´normal´ traffic signs and symbols are subliminally and cynically trying to tell us something? …

— Eva Ísleifsdóttir

“It´s a sign” by Eva Íslefsdóttir. Image/ Irene Murphy  

Rakel McMahon, which our readers should be familiar with, presents in the same issue her new work; “What is the purpose; it´s allreadmade.” Let´s see what the artist says about her artistic approach.

.. I´m interested in approaching and presenting my subject matter with reinterpretation, metaphors, and reevaluation of serious/humor and what is considered normal. The subject and issues I like working with are connected with gender, sexuality, stereotypes and normality.”

— Rakel McMahon

 “What is the purpose; it´s allreadmade.” by Rakel McMahon (2012) Image/Konsthopp

You can download Fetish, the 6th issue of KATALOG, here!

KATALOG is an online publication with video and sound capabilities which is dedicated to the practice of performance and live art.  Each issue deals with a different type of performance and in this issue we focus on artworks that deals with the object as an accompaniment or as the main focus of a performative work.  This call is open for artists from all disciplines from around the globe.  

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Filed under Art, Art Magazine, Favourite of the month, Iceland, Live art, Performance, Political Art, Sociopolitical art, Uncategorized, Visual Art

IN THE SAME CITY, UNDER THE SAME SKY…

Online public view: 19th of June – 1st of July 2012, MAP website (Sweden)

In the Same City, Under the Same Sky… is a series of short films made by the Polish artist Anna Konik. The artwork contains stories from seven women with foreign background living in Tensta, a suburb outside of Stockholm. These are tales of courage, regret, alienation and attempts to enter the Swedish society.

Photograph taken from MAP website

The women talk about their experiences of living in a forgotten part of Stockholm, when the reasons for coming there seldom were voluntary, but often traumatic. In the films we see seven women with Swedish origin in their homes in the city centre of Stockholm who retell the stories from the women in Tensta. The displacement of the narrative is a means for the artist to shed light on who’s stories we are ready to listen, who’s voice it is that counts.

Take a look at Anna Konik’s video here (without subtitle)

In the Same City, Under the Same Sky…is produced by MAP, Mobile Art Production in collaboration with the Polish Institute Stockholm, and with the support of Stockholm Municipality and Iaspis, where Konik was in residence during 2011.

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Filed under Art, Media, Multimedia, Performance, Political Art, Sociopolitical art, Uncategorized, Visual Art

“I WOULD LIKE TO SET A TREND!”

Artist talk: Mimosa Pale (Finland)

When I think about Finland, a bridge between east and west across my mind. The Finnish people — speaking Swedish by law but in general so different from the Swedes. Their own language — Finnish — so different from everything I´ve heard. And how does the Finnish heartbeat sounds like? Same but — in some way — different?

Mimosa Pale is our first Finnish interviewee. She is an incarnation of coolness — not only because she is an interesting artist — Mimosa also runs a hat store, where she sells her own design  Our guest blogger, Elina Lajunen worked with her in Berlin and introduced us to Mimosa´s intriguing world — of hats.

The curator; Katharina Rettelbach used these kindly words to describe Mimosa:

Her artwork is a synthesis of sculpture and performance art. In her often interactive work, humour, lust and celebration lead to carnevaleque staging. She likes to switch context being it museum, theatre, street or church. She acts in cabaret shows with her singing saw, creates haute-couture for everybody and makes fashion shows in her Berlin flat. Mimosa Pale has visited various international performance art festivals and is currently running Atelier Himo in Berlin.

We are getting one step closer to the Finnish heart. Read Mimosa Pale´s interview here.

Photograph taken from Ausland-Berlin

P.s. If you are Finnish; we hope you can write an article and unveil the secrets behind the mysterious Finnish art scene. Drop us a line at konsthopp@gmail.com

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Filed under Artist Talk, Finland, Installation, Konsthopp, Live art, Performance, Sculptures, Visual Art

“ART IS AN AMAZING WAY TO DEAL WITH LIFE”

– Interview with Tessa Praun (Sweden)

When did you start curating? Tell us something about your educational background and curatorial experience?

Curator Tessa Praun with Ai Wei Wei at his ateljé in 2010/ Photo by Magasin 3

 I started curating for real on my current job, the private art foundation Magasin 3 Stockholm Konsthall. My background is in the Humanities Study Program and Art History at Stockholm University. I did my final internship at IASPIS (International Artists Studio Program in Sweden), an artist in residency program that really got me interested in contemporary art. From there I moved on to shorter experiences at the Peggy Guggenheim Collection in Venice and as assistant curator at Kunstverein München, amongst others. In 2004 I started as assistant curator at Magasin 3 and became curator two years later. Since then I have curated exhibitions with artists such as Miroslav Tichy, Christian Boltanski, Annika von Hausswolff, Marijke van Warmerdam, Ai Weiwei, etc. and have done collaborative projects with other art institutions in Europe and been working with Magasin 3:s own collection.

What is your personal relationship with Ai Wei Wei and his work? How did it come about that you got to curate his show at Magasin 3?

I was very taken by Ai Weiwei’s project “Fairytale” that he did for Documenta XII, this impressive idea to invite 1001 Chinese people to come with him to Kassel in Germany in the summer of 2007. It is a fantastic social multi layered project that lives on through stories that are being told as well as through physical remaining parts with an amazing visual strength. Experiencing this work in Kassel made me read more about Ai Weiwei and follow the work he did after.

In 2010 I was in China and had the chance to visit Ai Weiwei in his combined home and studio in Beijing. This was in a time when he was already very pressed by the Chinese authorities and he had just been under a three days house arrest when we met. Meeting him in his own environment and under these pressing circumstances effected me strongly and coming back to Stockholm I invited him to have the exhibition here at Magasin 3 this spring.

Fairytale (dormitory) by Ai Wei Wei 

Tell us more about the Ai Wei Wei exhibition. What has been your main role as a curator of the show?

From the beginning I knew that I did not want to make a retrospective exhibition, instead I wanted a selection of works that focuses on China as synonymous to mass production and Ai Weiwei’s concern for the individual as a necessary part of the big mass. Ai Weiwei did the first selection of works that he and I then discussed and added to. Only a few months into working together, in the beginning of April 2011, he suddenly was arrested and kept detained on no legal grounds in an undisclosed location. Not knowing what was going to happen, if and when he would be released, me and my colleagues had to decide how to move on. Together with Ai Weiwei’s assistants we came to the conclusion that the best thing that we could do in that situation was to continue the preparations of the exhibition, it felt even more so important to show his work and make his voice heard. Despite my deep concerns for Ai Weiwei’s situation I had to focus as much as I could on completing the exhibition and do so in the most respectful way.

World Map by Ai Wei Wei

Can you explain the importance of the reading room being a part of the Ai Wei Wei exhibition? Why emphasize on all that information?

At the point when Ai Weiwei was detained and couldn’t be part of the preparations of the exhibition anymore, I felt it was important to give our visitors a deeper insight into Ai Weiwei’s situation, why he is on a collision course with the regime and consequently has become so known also outside the art world. So I developed a reading room. A physical one in the actual exhibition space, side by side with the artworks. It includes reading material, a sound archive where various people contributed with their stories and reflections on Ai Weiwei, interviews and documentaries on and by Ai Weiwei. But also a digital one, a special homepage gathering articles, documentaries, the sound archive, filmed documentation of all panel discussions that we have arranged in connection to the exhibition etc. in order for people to explore his work both as an artist, activist, blogger, architect. He himself does not really distinguish these roles. I found it interesting to bring this up through the reading room. Both the physical and digital reading room have proven very useful and much appreciated.

Video work by Ai Wei Wei 

Do you think new and digital media used in contemporary art has brought new aspects to arts and curating? Yes or no, explain why.

Well yes, I think since these new media are part of society today it is only a natural development that also artists explore them and art institutions adapt them in communicating with the audience. In some cases art can be brought closer to the viewer through various new media and attract those who are hard to reach in a more traditional manner. In our part of the world we live in a time with a tremendous fast pace. It is important that art can both adapt to these new circumstances but also offer a brake from just that. The content has to be the driving force otherwise the experience will be lost completely. It is a challenge for both artist and curator to find the right balance.

Stool by Ai Wei Wei

Photographs by Konsthopp

What qualities do you think a good curator should have?  

A good curator knows how to both support and challenge an artist, is curious and open minded, dedicated to the project and flexible to deal with different characters and situations under time pressure : )

From your point of view, how does the future of professional curating look like? What are your personal wishes, hopes and perspectives on your future curatorial plans?

My main motivation for being a curator is to learn more about life. Being close to art is an amazing way to deal with life, to explore notions of the present, history and future, to be inspired to thoughts and feelings. If I can transmit this also to other people then I think I am doing something good.

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Filed under Ceramic Art, Conversation, Curator, Curator Talk, Documentary, Fine Art, Installation, Political Art, Sculptures, Sociopolitical art, Stockholm, Textile Art, Uncategorized, Video Art, Visual Art

TONIGHT X 3

Vernissages: 24th of May 2012 (Stockholm)

TONIGHT X 3 is a collaboration beeween ANNAELLEGALLERY, Gallery Niklas Belenius and Young Art. The galleries are all in a walking distance from each other and on Thursday night last week they opened up their galleries and gave us — the visitors — a great opportunity to take an art stroll around the neighborhood, mingle and see some outstanding artwork. Later in the night they invited their guest to continue the art party at Berns Salonger. Great initiative by the gallery owners and I hope they continue the collaboration next fall!

To give you a little overview of the artwork of the night; I snapped some shots with my i-phone. Hope you enjoy!

Work by Ellisif Hals / ANNAELLEGALLERY

Work by Simon Mullan / ANNAELLEGALLERY

Work by Max Ockborn / ANNAELLEGALLERY

Work by Olof Inger / ANNAELLEGALLERY

Work by Timothy Crisp / Gallery Niklas Belenius 

Work by Jan Hofström / Gallery Niklas Belenius

Work by Andy Warhol / Gallery Niklas Belenius

Work by Gustaf Lilliestierna / Young Art 

Installation by Daniel Jouseff / Young Art

Work by Gustaf Lilliestierna / Young Art

Date: 24th of May 2011

Artists: Various

Places: ANNAELLEGALLERY (Riddargatan 41), Gallery Niklas Belenius (Ulrikagatan 13) & Young Art (Artillerigatan 6), Stockholm

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Filed under Art, Art stroll, Collage/Clip Art, Group exhibit, Installation, Light installation, Multimedia, Paintings, Political Art, Sculptures, Sociopolitical art, Stockholm, Textile Art, Visual Art, Young Art