Tag Archives: Art fair

AUTUMN ASSEMBLY IN AUGUST

Flavor of the month: Watershed

After a long and “oh-so-wanted” summer break — witch passed by “oh-so-amazingly-fast” — I can finally welcome my favorite season. The fall.

Although it´s sunny and over 20 °C outside my window (it doesn´t get any warmer here in Iceland) — all I can think about is misty days, multicolored leaves and my new umbrella.

Photos taken from google and pinterest

Watershed, a turning point or — a milestone are typical for this time of the year. Exciting assignments are coming up. Accordingly — the editors of Konsthopp are back to school, trying new exciting education. And I will finally move to my own “oh-so-wanted” apartment, with my “oh-so-fat” newborn.

Despite days loading work and other ethical obligations (e.g; changing diapers and doing boring housework!) — Konsthopp will try to keep on track, reporting live from the Nordic alternative art scene!

Happy fall everyone!

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Filed under Art, Art festival, Favourite of the month, Iceland, Konsthopp, Stockholm

UN_CURATE_ABLE

On-going: 30th of June – 2nd of September 2012, Toves Galleri (Copenhagen)

Un_Curate_Able is an exhibition project in three parts, organized, curated and produced by the artists at Tove’s Gallery. The project unfolds over the summer of 2012 in the following stages:

1. An uncurated group exhibition in Tove’s own premises, which examines and presents the current interests of Tove’s artists.

2. A re-curating of the exhibition in Fatforms space, an artist and curator-collective in Amsterdam. In this exhibition, Tove’s artists mix the roles of artist and curator, and thus renegotiate the initial positions of the first exhibition.

3. And finally, a contribution to the art fair during Copenhagen Art Festival, in which the three stages of Un_Curate_Able are documented in a live editing and production process, that results in a publication presented on a finissage at Tove’s Gallery.

Photographs and text by Amir Zainorin

Artists: Christian Jeppsson (SE), Hannah Heilmann (DK), Simon Damkjær (DK), Pind (DK), Jacob Jessen (DK), Honza Hoeck (DK), Uffe Holm (DK), Sandra Vaka Olsen (NO), Rasmus Høj Mygind (DK)

Date: 30th of June – 2nd of September 2012

Place: Toves Galleri, Vesterbrogade 97, Copenhagen

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Filed under Amir Zainorin, Art, Copenhagen, Fine Art, Guest blog, Visual Art

NORTHERN LIGHTS

Final words: Icelandic Arts Festival

The summer is the season of social gatherings. Fun, festivities and festivals. Beside the fun (and the fest) — festivals are one of the most important tools of any given art market. Folks have a chance to get an overview; explore and enjoy contemporary art.

Most of my favorites festivals are held away from the noisy city. Close to nature — where creative people meets — miracles can happen. Scandinavians are also known to enjoy an especially close relationship to nature. Drinking a flat beer from a bottle, sleeping on a sopping ground — singing along with old popular songs. A necessary part of an overall bulletproof program.

The life does´t get any better.

Northern lights, Jökulsárlón

These two alternative art festivals highlights the beauty of Icelandic nature and national spirit.

Æringur (Rif, Snæfellsnes)

Æringur is an international, artists run festival that is held in a different location every year and focuses on the smaller communities dotting the Icelandic coastline. The festival allows artists to experience the atmosphere outside the capital region and invites them into a space that is not necessarily intended for art exhibitions. It is conceived as a site specific project, that deals with the society and the environment it is held in. Therefore the artists, taking part in the project, stay for a number of days on site before the opening, to develop and work on their projects.

More Northern lights, Snæfellsnes

LungA (Seyðisfjörður)

LungA Art festival is a yearly event held on the east coast of Iceland, in Seydisfjördur. Seyðisfjordur is a small town, decorated with old, well maintained houses and surrounded by an extraordinary views over the mountains and fjords. The festival creates a space were electric vibes from various art forms melt together when artist from all over the world unites at one place through their creativity

Even more Northern lights, Iceland

Photographs taken from google image

.The life is now. Live a little!

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Filed under Art, Art festival, Iceland, Konsthopp, Uncategorized

(I)NDEPENDENT PEOPLE

Reykjavík Arts Festival 2012

We are counting down to Reykjavík Arts Festival grand opening …

The focus this year will be on contemporary visual art collaborates from the Nordic and Baltic countries, under the name (I)ndependent People. The project will involve many of Reykjavík’s exhibition spaces, museums, galleries and public space during the festival season and throughout the summer.

We got an opportunity to peek behind the scenes in Reykjavik´s Art Museum earlier this week.  Jóna Hlíf Halldórsdóttir told us about her teamwork with Hlynur Hallson but they will present large-ranging and very exciting project on Saturday. Jóna Hlíf was kind enough to let us in and take a few shoot from the set up.

Photographs by Konsthopp

(I)ndependent People is an extensive project which brings together 29 artist-collectives with the collaboration of over 100 participants. It´s curated by the Swedish curator and theorist Jonatan Habib Engqvist but we will be publishing an interview with him on the opening day.

The festival announcement says:

(I)ndependent People asks if and how collaboration can operate in continual negotiation between contesting ideas and desires, yet allowing unplanned and transformative action.

Saturday 19th of May will be dedicated to openings of the exhibitions. Here is the schedule to our alternative art stroll and you are — of course — welcome to join us:

13.00 – Listasafn Íslands, Laufásvegur 2
14.00 – Myndhöggvaarfélagið, Nýlendugata 15 and i8 gallerí, Tryggvagata 16
15.00 – Listasafn Reykjavíkur, Hafnarhús, Tryggvagata 17
16.00 – Listasafn ASÍ, Freyjugata 41
17.00 – Kling & Bang gallerí, Hverfisgata 42
18.00 – Nýló and Artíma gallerí, Skúlagata 23

And don´t miss the international seminar in the Nordic House on Sunday 20th of May at 13.00.

Have a nice and sunny art weekend!

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Filed under Konsthopp, Reykjavík, Reykjavik Arts Festival, Sociopolitical art

MARSHMALLOWS IN MAY

Flavor of the month: Art festivals

May is a good month when it comes to art.

Work by Hanna Frostell (Konstfack exhibition 2011)

In Stockholm, students from Konstfack, Mejan, Beckmans and Berghs will all be presenting their graduation work — new ideas, trends, perspectives — which is really something looking forward to. One of our “artist talk” artist, Erla Silfá, is releasing her final project, Can’t hear my eyes, at Bio Rio the 21st — which I am personally very excited to hear — and Galleri Fotfolket just opened last friday, as the first mobile art gallery in the city.

From the opening of Galleri Fotfolket 11th of May 2012

In Reykjavík, we’ve already been at the graduation exhibition at LHÍ and in a week from now, one of the oldest and most respected arts festivals in Northern Europe, Reykjavík Art Festivalis opening — bringing together 29 artist-collectives with the collaboration of over 100 participants.

Konsthopp will (of course) be on the spot, reporting ‘the créme de la créme’ from the festival!

Art in Translation is another kind of biennial, a 3-day conference event that aims to create an interdisciplinary forum to explore connections between language and various art forms, this year emphasising on creative writing. At last we should also mention MESSA Vision, a small-scale teaser for MESSA 2013 – an ambitious project that claims to be “the first international visual art fair to be held in Iceland”.

Work by Assa Kauppi (Galleri Andersson/Sandström) – Art Copenhagen 2011

Photographs by Konsthopp

Beside what’s mentioned above, many of the art galleries are opening their last exhibition this month, before summer-closing.

We’ll try our best to keep you updated — so be sure you follow! And please let us know about other art festivals / happenings in your city!

Happy Sunday everyone!

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Filed under Art, Art festival, Conference, Conversation, Konsthopp, Live art, Reykjavík, Stockholm

CURATING IS AN INTUITIVE & MAGICAL PROCESS

— Interview with Thale Fastvold and Tanja Thorjussen, LOCUS (Norway)

When did you start curating? Tell us something about your educational background?

LOCUS: We met while studying curating at Telemark University College in 2006, and seeing as we both are artists, we discovered that we had a many common denominators in our views on curating as well. Thale is trained in photography/text from Rome and Oslo, and Tanja in drawing/painting from Bergen and New York. We decided to work together, and founded LOCUS art and curator group. The first thing we curated was a series of video art events in Oslo and Trondheim. Since then we have curated and collaborated on smaller and bigger art shows in Oslo, Voss, Nissedal and New York. We work as curators, artists, art consultants (for KORO/Public Art Norway) and writers. In 2009 LOCUS published the book “Kurator?” an anthology of interviews with, and texts by curators working in Norway.

What is the artistic field of your curatorial practice?

LOCUS: The most important aspect of curating is threefold, 1) the theme 2) the artwork and 3) how it is conveyed/contextualized within the given space.

We normally have a clear vision and focus regarding the theme of the exhibitions. Often it has been inspired by political, scientific or spiritual events. Developing a theme, we work very intuitively, and in some respects almost scientifically. We do a lot of research on the topic; we attempt to explore and excavate the theme, and we do not have all the answers until the exhibition/project is over. For example, in our book project “Kurator?”, we investigated how curators work in Norway today, and we didn’t know from the outset what we were going to find. When we curate, we invite artists we believe will respond to, and create an interesting dialogue based on the given theme. We look at a lot of artists and follow their work, so when we invite somebody to participate in a project we trust them and their process of working.

How an artwork or the theme is conveyed is also an important part of our work. For instance, for the video art events we curated, we decided to make the screening of the videos a “one time only”-event, over the course of one evening. Our intention was that the audience should view the entire work in a focused setting, not see the work broken up in parts, which often happen when video is showed in a loop and you walk in on a work in progress.

As to the artistic field of curating, we will always bring with us our background as artists. When we work with art projects, whether the outcome is a curated show, our own exhibition, or a book, the process will always be colored by our background/experience.

Yonder” in Galleri 69, Oslo (2008)

Yonder” in Galleri 69, Oslo (2008)

Is there a difference in curating different field of arts, etc. paintings, videos, interactive works or a piece of net art?

LOCUS: Yes, and no! We started curating video art since the media is easy to transport, and we could easily make pop up video art exhibitions in borrowed spaces.

It requires much more preparation organizing a bigger exhibition space with large paintings and installations, and it can be more expensive to produce, but in essence the process is the same. We are a nomadic curator group, we do not have our own gallery space and we never know in advance if we will get public funding for a project, so we are used to finding creative solutions to different obstacles. Other elements in preparing a show – the planning, applying for funding, writing project outlines, press releases, shipping and installation – are not very different from show to show, everything needs to be done. After 6 years of collaboration we have experienced that being two does not just double our capacity, it quadruples it and often makes us more efficient than working solo. We discuss, plan and organize, and the project never suffers since one of us can always fill in and back up if the other is preoccupied. We trust each other, communicate easily and are very much in unison with the projects we work on.

What kind of qualities do you think a curator should have?

Thale: A curator needs to be open minded, flexible and good with editing, both when it comes to artworks and text!

Tanja: And be a good mediator and have a functional toolbox.

Blackening.” Galleri 69, Oslo (2008)

Blackening.” Galleri 69, Oslo (2008)

Do you think that new and digital media used in contemporary art has brought new aspects to arts and curating? Yes or no, explain why?

LOCUS: It has opened up a wider area in which to explore and experience art. Artists always question the status quo, and now digital media is just that. But it is important to create the best way to present an artwork, as everything surrounding the work has a context, now video has established the black box, painting the white cube etc. so it will be interesting to see how digital media art will best be conveyed. Experiencing artwork is really very private, it is you and the work, and so is our interaction with our computer. It is especially interesting with the new Google art project, which makes museums and art available to the public through the computer, but for a curator it is also a great tool for studying curatorial decisions.

In times of “You Tube” and the Internet, do you think a curator is still needed?

LOCUS: Yes, definitely. The curator is often the conveyor of meaning, the translator and the person who can help both audience and artists in forming a closer and better relationship with one another. The curator is also of great help to the artists; many artists want to focus solely on creating the work and don’t always wish to spend valuable time conveying their art to the audience.

What are your curatorial plans for the future? What are your personal wishes, hopes and perspectives in curating?

LOCUS: Right now we are working on a show presenting our own work at the project space at Tegneforbundet in Oslo (which opens Sept. 27, 2012) where we through drawing, photo and installation investigate what happens to the soul after death, before next life cycle. We are very conscious about the space, lighting, sound etc, and want to create a very specific mood in the room. When we create a show with our own art we can be freer or more immediate in how we alter the room. When we work with presenting other people’s art, we have to work with the artist to find out what they want to achieve, and how the essence in their artwork can be most adeptly expressed. Placing meaningful objects like art in a room is very hands-on and instinctual, and as curators we try to be true to the artworks.

It is easy to discuss curating in an academic way, but it is very much an intuitive process, and a magical process, and we hope that these aspects of curating will be explored further in the future.

Thale: I started a window box gallery in Oslo last year, within the Pushwagner gallery, where each month I curate smaller shows with emerging artists, and I will continue that project. When I curate shows or work as an art consultant, I aim at including 50% male and female artists, and I also wish to showcase younger artists. Of course, the most important thing for me is to curate interesting shows, which to me are shows that arouse something in its viewers, and give the audience a new perspective, whether this is on society, contemporary art or both.

Tanja: Through art projects and curatorial projects alike I explore something I don’t know, but which stirs my interest.

Now I am working on a Performance Laboratorium (co-curated with Gudrun Flatebø), which will be held at the cultural space Galleri 69 & Kafe MIR at Lufthavna in Oslo this fall. Initially I thought it would be interesting to create a performance lab because I did not know much about performance, I did not think I fully understood the history of performance and what performance is, it is a very mysterious art form as it is so hard to define.

Kurator?” A book by Thale Fastvold and Tanja Thorjussen / LOCUS (2009)

PHOTOGRAPHS BELONG TO LOCUS

What is the future of professional curating from your point of view?

LOCUS: In 2004 two curatorial study programs were established in Norway, and since then we have seen an escalating professionalization of the Norwegian curator. Before there where mostly artists or art historians who did this job. Last year the Norwegian Association of Curators was founded, which is an important step in professionalization, and we think the society and the art world in particular is increasingly starting to see the value of the curator. There is a great interest in contemporary art, but with conceptualism, postmodernism and all the other —isms of the last 40 years, the audience sometimes depends on someone to convey the art. Curators can have this and many other functions. There are so many ways of curating and so many venues of discussing curating, like Konsthopp, so we think the future of curating is very positive and exciting!

LOCUS is an art and curator group established in 2006 by Thale Fastvold and Tanja Thorjussen.Both educated as artists and curators we have exhibited in New York, Oslo, Trondheim, Reykjavik and Zurich. LOCUS have curated video-art events, exhibitions and are collaborators on various art projects in Norway and abroad.

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Filed under Art, Artist books, Curator, Curator Talk, Konsthopp, Oslo, Uncategorized, Video Art, Visual Art

FLURRY FEBRUARY

This month’s favorite: Stockholm / Sweden

I know I’m late with this one. Four days late actually. But I wanted to let you know about my favourite of the month — Stockholm — and put in few photographs of some of the things I liked. I know you’ll forgive me for “being late”  but — as I’m writing this with one hand — I can tell you that I had to operate my elbow last month and consequently it is wrapped in a big white bandage right now. So there you got my excuse.

February started at Färgfabriken with the art group NUMEN (for use) and the exhibition TEJP Stockholm. The opening night was (like it usually is at Färfabriken) packed with people, wine and music. The exhibition is beautiful, exceptionally playful and really a lot of fun. It is still ongoing and is highly recommended!

For more info about Färgfabriken click here

From the opening night of TEJP STOCKHOLM at Färgfabriken

Photograph taken inside the tape installation.

Later in the month (17th-19th of February) there were the two artfairs, SUPERMARKET (at Kulturhuset) and MARKET (at Konstakademien).

Supermarket is a development of Minimarket, an artist groupshow held at Konstnärshuset in February 2006, in reaction to the commercial art fair Market. The arrangers of the Minimarket didn’t like Market’s concentration on customers with money and wanted Minimarket to present another side of the art — the one that is more fun and playful. In 2007 the arrangers change the name to Supermarket and now they refer to it as a “success story”, where Supermarket is today one of the biggest artist-run artfairs in the world.

This year Supermarket represented 80 galleries from 30 countries. Here are some of my favourites from the weekend.

For more info about Supermarket click here

Nest (The Hague, Holland), Supermarket 2012

GRAD (Belgrade, Serbia), Supermarket 2012

Galleria Huuto (Helsinki, Finland), Supermarket 2012

Studio44 (Stockholm, Sweden) Supermarket 2012

Tegen2 (Stockholm, Sweden), Supermarket 2012

Totaldobze (Riga, Latvia), Supermarket 2012

New for Supermarket this year was the “Red Spot”, a specially arranged stage dedicated to performance artists. As performance art has been growing on me (especially after my visit to ANTI festival in Finland), I believe this was a brilliant addition to the fair! The high-light of my weekend was Paul Dunca’s vampire performance, Incubus Crybtmaw. Scary, creepy, funny (some might say crazy), Dunca managed to connect delicately with the audience while questioning the performance artists goals and nature.

“Incubus Crybtmaw”. Performance by Paul Dunca, Supermarket 2012

Then there was the Market. It was more traditional/conservative than Supermarket but representing many of the best galleries in the Nordic region (42 art galleries). There it is price and quality that matters. Unfortunately my camera ran out of battery and the only examples I got was from Gallery Andersson/Sandström (which also happened to be our favourite at Art Copenhagen). Other favourites were Stene Projects, Gallery Nordenhake, Gallery Charlotte Lund, and the emerging galleries Gallery Anna Thulin and Galleri Jonas Kleerup.

Some might say that these two art fairs are “enemies” and competitors but even though that might be a reason for their existence I believe both of these fairs are important for the audience/participants and help establish Stockholm on the art world map.

For more info about Market click here

Gallery Andersson/Sandström (Stockholm/Umeå, Sweden), Market 2012

Gallery Andersson/Sandström (Stockholm/Umeå, Sweden), Market 2012

Last but not least is the urban artist ROA, who was supposed to be pimping up Stockholm with his huge wall-painted animals (I’ve heard that unfortunately this wasn’t really the case because of Stockholm’s ‘zero-tolerance’ for street art — only one wall in Alvik & Stockholm’s archipelago got the honour). As you may remember (refresh your memory here) ROA put up a show in Stockholm last month. I couldn’t go that night but as I’ve heard from friends the show was amazing! Good party and stunning artwork. ROA might have lost some of his deserved attention because of the two artfairs happening at the same time, at least I haven’t seen any media been writing about it yet (except here). But he definitely deserves the attention of art-interested audience and lucky for us we can still see his installation/work until the 17th of March. The Scarlett gallery opens the location to the public (as the work had to be done inside) between Friday and Sunday but if you want to see it outside the opening hours, just contact the gallery and they’ll open up for you!

For more info about ROA’s work in Stockholm (and opening hours) click here


From the opening night at Defragmentation (ROA) / Photos by Ashlee Christman

Photographs belong to Konsthopp

I admit that Stockholm might be dull sometimes — but it was surprisingly vivid last month. It exposed different forms of visual art and its representation. Even — in the city of zero tolerance — street art was included (and maybe one day it will be accepted too). This is just a glimpse of what was going on and I’m sure its not the first (or last) time Stockholm is a little ‘flurry’ like that. Still, I thought I would use the occasion to recognize and appreciate it. And pick it as my February favourite.

Hold to your creativity Stockholm! xx

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Filed under Art, Art festival, Art Magazine, Favourite of the month, Stockholm