Tag Archives: Artist books

CURATING IS AN INTUITIVE & MAGICAL PROCESS

— Interview with Thale Fastvold and Tanja Thorjussen, LOCUS (Norway)

When did you start curating? Tell us something about your educational background?

LOCUS: We met while studying curating at Telemark University College in 2006, and seeing as we both are artists, we discovered that we had a many common denominators in our views on curating as well. Thale is trained in photography/text from Rome and Oslo, and Tanja in drawing/painting from Bergen and New York. We decided to work together, and founded LOCUS art and curator group. The first thing we curated was a series of video art events in Oslo and Trondheim. Since then we have curated and collaborated on smaller and bigger art shows in Oslo, Voss, Nissedal and New York. We work as curators, artists, art consultants (for KORO/Public Art Norway) and writers. In 2009 LOCUS published the book “Kurator?” an anthology of interviews with, and texts by curators working in Norway.

What is the artistic field of your curatorial practice?

LOCUS: The most important aspect of curating is threefold, 1) the theme 2) the artwork and 3) how it is conveyed/contextualized within the given space.

We normally have a clear vision and focus regarding the theme of the exhibitions. Often it has been inspired by political, scientific or spiritual events. Developing a theme, we work very intuitively, and in some respects almost scientifically. We do a lot of research on the topic; we attempt to explore and excavate the theme, and we do not have all the answers until the exhibition/project is over. For example, in our book project “Kurator?”, we investigated how curators work in Norway today, and we didn’t know from the outset what we were going to find. When we curate, we invite artists we believe will respond to, and create an interesting dialogue based on the given theme. We look at a lot of artists and follow their work, so when we invite somebody to participate in a project we trust them and their process of working.

How an artwork or the theme is conveyed is also an important part of our work. For instance, for the video art events we curated, we decided to make the screening of the videos a “one time only”-event, over the course of one evening. Our intention was that the audience should view the entire work in a focused setting, not see the work broken up in parts, which often happen when video is showed in a loop and you walk in on a work in progress.

As to the artistic field of curating, we will always bring with us our background as artists. When we work with art projects, whether the outcome is a curated show, our own exhibition, or a book, the process will always be colored by our background/experience.

Yonder” in Galleri 69, Oslo (2008)

Yonder” in Galleri 69, Oslo (2008)

Is there a difference in curating different field of arts, etc. paintings, videos, interactive works or a piece of net art?

LOCUS: Yes, and no! We started curating video art since the media is easy to transport, and we could easily make pop up video art exhibitions in borrowed spaces.

It requires much more preparation organizing a bigger exhibition space with large paintings and installations, and it can be more expensive to produce, but in essence the process is the same. We are a nomadic curator group, we do not have our own gallery space and we never know in advance if we will get public funding for a project, so we are used to finding creative solutions to different obstacles. Other elements in preparing a show – the planning, applying for funding, writing project outlines, press releases, shipping and installation – are not very different from show to show, everything needs to be done. After 6 years of collaboration we have experienced that being two does not just double our capacity, it quadruples it and often makes us more efficient than working solo. We discuss, plan and organize, and the project never suffers since one of us can always fill in and back up if the other is preoccupied. We trust each other, communicate easily and are very much in unison with the projects we work on.

What kind of qualities do you think a curator should have?

Thale: A curator needs to be open minded, flexible and good with editing, both when it comes to artworks and text!

Tanja: And be a good mediator and have a functional toolbox.

Blackening.” Galleri 69, Oslo (2008)

Blackening.” Galleri 69, Oslo (2008)

Do you think that new and digital media used in contemporary art has brought new aspects to arts and curating? Yes or no, explain why?

LOCUS: It has opened up a wider area in which to explore and experience art. Artists always question the status quo, and now digital media is just that. But it is important to create the best way to present an artwork, as everything surrounding the work has a context, now video has established the black box, painting the white cube etc. so it will be interesting to see how digital media art will best be conveyed. Experiencing artwork is really very private, it is you and the work, and so is our interaction with our computer. It is especially interesting with the new Google art project, which makes museums and art available to the public through the computer, but for a curator it is also a great tool for studying curatorial decisions.

In times of “You Tube” and the Internet, do you think a curator is still needed?

LOCUS: Yes, definitely. The curator is often the conveyor of meaning, the translator and the person who can help both audience and artists in forming a closer and better relationship with one another. The curator is also of great help to the artists; many artists want to focus solely on creating the work and don’t always wish to spend valuable time conveying their art to the audience.

What are your curatorial plans for the future? What are your personal wishes, hopes and perspectives in curating?

LOCUS: Right now we are working on a show presenting our own work at the project space at Tegneforbundet in Oslo (which opens Sept. 27, 2012) where we through drawing, photo and installation investigate what happens to the soul after death, before next life cycle. We are very conscious about the space, lighting, sound etc, and want to create a very specific mood in the room. When we create a show with our own art we can be freer or more immediate in how we alter the room. When we work with presenting other people’s art, we have to work with the artist to find out what they want to achieve, and how the essence in their artwork can be most adeptly expressed. Placing meaningful objects like art in a room is very hands-on and instinctual, and as curators we try to be true to the artworks.

It is easy to discuss curating in an academic way, but it is very much an intuitive process, and a magical process, and we hope that these aspects of curating will be explored further in the future.

Thale: I started a window box gallery in Oslo last year, within the Pushwagner gallery, where each month I curate smaller shows with emerging artists, and I will continue that project. When I curate shows or work as an art consultant, I aim at including 50% male and female artists, and I also wish to showcase younger artists. Of course, the most important thing for me is to curate interesting shows, which to me are shows that arouse something in its viewers, and give the audience a new perspective, whether this is on society, contemporary art or both.

Tanja: Through art projects and curatorial projects alike I explore something I don’t know, but which stirs my interest.

Now I am working on a Performance Laboratorium (co-curated with Gudrun Flatebø), which will be held at the cultural space Galleri 69 & Kafe MIR at Lufthavna in Oslo this fall. Initially I thought it would be interesting to create a performance lab because I did not know much about performance, I did not think I fully understood the history of performance and what performance is, it is a very mysterious art form as it is so hard to define.

Kurator?” A book by Thale Fastvold and Tanja Thorjussen / LOCUS (2009)

PHOTOGRAPHS BELONG TO LOCUS

What is the future of professional curating from your point of view?

LOCUS: In 2004 two curatorial study programs were established in Norway, and since then we have seen an escalating professionalization of the Norwegian curator. Before there where mostly artists or art historians who did this job. Last year the Norwegian Association of Curators was founded, which is an important step in professionalization, and we think the society and the art world in particular is increasingly starting to see the value of the curator. There is a great interest in contemporary art, but with conceptualism, postmodernism and all the other —isms of the last 40 years, the audience sometimes depends on someone to convey the art. Curators can have this and many other functions. There are so many ways of curating and so many venues of discussing curating, like Konsthopp, so we think the future of curating is very positive and exciting!

LOCUS is an art and curator group established in 2006 by Thale Fastvold and Tanja Thorjussen.Both educated as artists and curators we have exhibited in New York, Oslo, Trondheim, Reykjavik and Zurich. LOCUS have curated video-art events, exhibitions and are collaborators on various art projects in Norway and abroad.

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Filed under Art, Artist books, Curator, Curator Talk, Konsthopp, Oslo, Uncategorized, Video Art, Visual Art

LORD OF THE CASTLE ITCH YES

Vernissage: 12th of May 2011, CRYSTAL (Stockholm)

A part of Holmstrand´s installation

On our usual Thursday night art stroll, Konsthopp stumbled across a surprisingly good performance. It was the premiere of “Making Up Stories”, a new performance by and with Leif Holmstrand. The gallery was crowded and it was quite hard to see what was really going on, but what we could hear was Holmstrand´s dark voice emitting repeatedly “BE CAREFUL, BE BEAUTIFUL!” The stage was surrounded by the surrealistic (and a little “creepy”!) atmosphere in his installations, mostly made from tights and socks.

“Making Up Stories” a performance by Leif Holmstrand

It has been claimed that Holmstrand´s performances both activate and complete his work. As stated in an announcement from Moderna Museet 2010:

Leif Holmstrand plays with the tension between his own handiwork and the varying capacity of fabricated objects to influence our life conditions. And terror and comedy are never far off in the result.

WHORE!  A book by Leif Holmstrand

Photographs by Konsthopp

This same night a new catalogue “Catalogue Katalog 720418-2492 Leif Holmstrand 1997-2010” was also released. Holmstrand has published many books and it´s in a way symbolic for the artist that some of the books are published under the name Anna-Maria Ytterboml.

Leif Holmstrand lives and works as a poet and artist in Malmö. His previous work has been shown at Moderna Museet, Bonniers Konsthall and Malmö Konsthall to name few. This exhibition is Leif Holmstrands’ second solo exhibition at CRYSTAL.

Date: 12th of May – 12th of June 2011

Artist: Leif Holmstrand

Place: CRYSTAL, Hudiksvallsgatan 4B, Stockholm

Opening hours: Wednesday – Friday, 12.00  – 18.00 ; Saturday – Sunday 12.00 – 16. 00. Or by appointment.

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Filed under Artist books, Installation, Konsthopp, Performance, Solo exhibit, Stockholm, Textile Art

LIMITS OF JURISDICTION

Vernissage: 7th of May 2011, Färgfabriken (Stockholm)

“Classy, without being uptight” was the look of Saturday night. The atmosphere in Färgfabriken was coloured by the guest´s excitement for Knorr´s first solo exhibition in Sweden. The artist welcomed everyone with a little toast speech as he described his latest offspring, “Limits of Jurisdiction”. His tastefully picked beige-coloured suit matched perfectly into the snow-white exhibition space.

“Natural cultural” is the title of the work that Daniel Knorr has created for Färgfabriken. The installation is based on architectural structure, which is used in order to problematize the nature and development of the economical processes that started at the dawn of the industrial period and have continued until this day.

Photographs by Konsthopp

The project “Limits of Jurisdiction” consists of three parts: “Artist Books”, an ongoing book project presented at The Romanian Cultural Institute of Stockholm, “1m3 Freedom” located in public space at Sergels Torg and “Natural Cultural” in Färgfabriken.

Daniel Knorr was born in Romania and currently lives in Berlin. His projects are widely known and certainly worth checking out for everyone who are interested in contemporary art.

Date: 7th of May – 14th of August 2011

Artist: Daniel Knorr

Place: Färgfabriken, Lövholmsbrinken 1, Stockholm

Opening hours: Wednesday – Sunday, 11.00  – 16.00



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Filed under Artist books, Installation, Konsthopp, Political Art, Sculptures, Solo exhibit, Stockholm