Tag Archives: Group exhibition

HEIMSENDIR / THE END OF THE WORLD

Vernissage: 10th of August 2012, Artíma Gallerí (Reykjavik)

Natural disasters, weapon of mass destruction, reversal of Earth’s magnetic field or excessive alcohol drinking …

What’s wrong with the world? — What might end it? — And why?

These are classic questions which are often asked even though it´s given that nobody knows — for sure — the correct answer.

Here is a tiny glimpse of how our world might end …

Photographs by Konsthopp

Death, disaster and — to a lesser extent, notions of apocalypse have always been visible in the art history. Concerns about the end of the world were often found in films of the 50’s, 60’s and 70’s and the topic seems to have made a remarkable comeback in further contemporary art forms last decades. The theme appeared most recently in “Heimsendir,” an ambitious group exhibition in Artima gallery.

The exhibition was particularly diverse, as you can expect when 23 artists are displaying their work together. The artists are former classmates that studied together at the Iceland Academy of Arts from 2006 to 2009. After their graduation the students headed to different directions — all bringing back new educations, experiences and outlooks.

Apparently — the classmates were cheerful to renew their friendship. After a great night out — waking up the day after with appropriated hangover — some of them probably thought:

Hey, this headache might end the world!

Date: 10th – 19th of August 2012

Artists: Amanda Tyahur, Anne Marte Overaa, Arna Óttarsdóttir, Auður Arna Oddgeirsdóttir, Bergdís Hörn Guðvarðardóttir and María Dalberg, Brynja Kjartansdóttir, Davíð Hólm Júlíusson, Emil Mangúsarson Borhammar, Erla Silfá Hordvik Þorgrímsdóttir, Haraldur Sigmundsson, Hlynur Heimisson, Jonatan Jannert, Kolbrún Ýr Einarsdóttir, Rebekka Guðleifsdóttir, Sara Ross, Sigurlaug Gísladóttir, Solveig Pálsdóttir, Sunna Schram, Þorvaldur Jónsson, Þórarinn Ingi Jónsson, Þórður Grímsson and Örn Alexander Ámundasson

Curator: Árný Fjóla Ásmundsdóttir

Place: Artíma Gallerí, Skúlagata 28, Reykjavik

P.s. In relation to the exhibition the artists published a book that can be bought at the gallery. If you are interested you can check out the graduation exhibition from the same group in 2009 here

Leave a comment

Filed under Art, Group exhibit, Iceland, Konsthopp, Multimedia, Reykjavík

UN_CURATE_ABLE

On-going: 30th of June – 2nd of September 2012, Toves Galleri (Copenhagen)

Un_Curate_Able is an exhibition project in three parts, organized, curated and produced by the artists at Tove’s Gallery. The project unfolds over the summer of 2012 in the following stages:

1. An uncurated group exhibition in Tove’s own premises, which examines and presents the current interests of Tove’s artists.

2. A re-curating of the exhibition in Fatforms space, an artist and curator-collective in Amsterdam. In this exhibition, Tove’s artists mix the roles of artist and curator, and thus renegotiate the initial positions of the first exhibition.

3. And finally, a contribution to the art fair during Copenhagen Art Festival, in which the three stages of Un_Curate_Able are documented in a live editing and production process, that results in a publication presented on a finissage at Tove’s Gallery.

Photographs and text by Amir Zainorin

Artists: Christian Jeppsson (SE), Hannah Heilmann (DK), Simon Damkjær (DK), Pind (DK), Jacob Jessen (DK), Honza Hoeck (DK), Uffe Holm (DK), Sandra Vaka Olsen (NO), Rasmus Høj Mygind (DK)

Date: 30th of June – 2nd of September 2012

Place: Toves Galleri, Vesterbrogade 97, Copenhagen

Leave a comment

Filed under Amir Zainorin, Art, Copenhagen, Fine Art, Guest blog, Visual Art

KONSTFACK SPRING EXHIBITION ’12

Vernissage: 16th of May 2012, Konstfack (Stockholm)

A glimpse in photographs from the opening of the spring exhibition at Konstfack last Wednesday. The exhibition is open until Sunday 27th of May. Stay tuned for more photographs and interviews!

 Live show & performance by Dyke Hard

“The ceremony” by Tobias Larsson

“I wasn’t allowed to wear black” by Liv Pettersson

“Lugnt, Stillsamt, Vackert” by Julia Dalgren

“PATTERN ATTACK” by Lisa Dalenius

“Smara” by Emma Persson

“Girls Club” by Karin Kakan Hermansson

“Happy meal” by Supawan Sihapoompichit

Work by Ida Bentinger

“Extensions, retractions, and missing parts” by Bianca Niabuco

“Ramené” by Emilie Florin

Work by Yusi-Chen

Work by Jonna Fransson

Photographs by Konsthopp

You can check out Konstfack´s 2011 exhibition here and here!

Artists: Newly graduates with Bachelor and Master degrees from Konstfack

Date: 16th – 27th of May 2012

Place: Konstfack, Telefonplan, Stockholm

1 Comment

Filed under Art, Ceramic Art, Collage/Clip Art, Design, Digital Art, Fashion, Group exhibit, Installation, Konstfack, Konsthopp, Media, Photography, Stockholm, Textile Art, Uncategorized, Visual Art

THE HIGH SPIRITS OF COLLABORATING

— Interview with Jonatan Habib Engqvist (Sweden)

Photograph taken from OCA

Photograph taken from OCA

Reykjavík Arts Festival 2012 had its kick off at Harpa (Reykjavík Concert and Conference Hall) on Friday night. Since 2004 the festival has been held annually in the capital city of Iceland, each year concentrating specifically on different fields of arts. Last year it was music — this year it’s visual arts. As we mentioned in the post (I)ndependent People, the large-scale exhibition is a collaborative visual arts project that involves many of Reykjavík’s various exhibition spaces during the festival and throughout the summer. Two weeks ago I was lucky enough to have the opportunity to meet up with the curator of (I)ndependent people, Jonatan Habib Engqvist, in his time-intervals between answering e-mails and preparing last-minute actions. Over a long cup of coffee Jonatan told me all about the exhibition, his personal speculations about the project and his own role as a curator.

From the opening at Harpa Friday night

ONE BIG EXPERIMENT

The idea of (I)ndependent people came after a seminar called Alternative North that was hold in Reykjavík in 2011, concerning the economical crises and artists initiatives. The last two biennial formats at Reykjavík Arts Festival (curated by Jessica Morgan in 2005 & Ólafur Elíasson in 2008) were some “big deals” with big budgets. In between there were the financial crisis — and now it’s Jonatan’s turn to curate a biennale with artist-run initiatives.

“The brief I got from Reykajvík Arts Festival (Alternative power station of the North) was strong, even though it seemed like a quite job with compound co-operation between different institutions. But there was something exciting about it in terms of curating and I thought that maybe this complex co-operation might be an interesting focus for the whole biennale.”

Jonatan tells me genuinely how he never thought it would actually work out. He already had his job and gave a radical counter-proposal to the organizers of the festival.

“I thought that maybe this could be the concept itself — the collaboration — to make the biennale to an experiment and see if it holds. I received 100% support. When they said yes to the unbelievable there was no going back. And this whole support makes it a pretty radical exhibition in terms of an international biennale. The conglomerate of art galleries, artist-driven initiatives and artists groups (and their will to co-operate) is what will make this possible. You could say that the entire exhibition is like a one big experiment. Why? Cause it’s fun!”

A SINGLE SIMPLE RULE

“I have received so much support, incredibly much freedom — the organizers are satisfied as long as I keep the budget. Which is incredible and actually pretty cool.”

And from there — the collaboration — the idea starts growing. Jonatan tells me about the idea and how he really wants to take it as far as it goes. There are no solo artists, only groups and collaborations between artists — which is something opposite to the whole biennale logic.

“Normally biennales are based on superstars. And for me the curatorial process is exciting, even though I’ve had to say no to artists that are “big” and which work I like. But I have been very tough — holding hard to a one simple rule. NO solo artists. This is what the whole thing is based on. Everyone work on the same terms, there are no solo exhibitions and beside that there has to be a genuine exchange between partners, a negotiation and artwork that influences the theme.”

HOW MANY CURATORS TO SCREW A LIGHT BULB?

We discuss further the collaboration and I ask Jonatan about his role as a curator. He throws me an insider joke and asks me if I know how many curators I need to screw a light bulb?

“It depends on the budget! Everything will work out (or as they say in Iceland “þetta reddast”) as long as you keep budget. Do it yourself if you can’t afford it … So what I am trying to do is just to take some of the on-going happenings and gather them at one place. That’s what you do as a curator. To gather stuff and see what happens if you put this stuff in the same room. I see one thing there and another thing there — and wander what happens if I put them together. It’s not really that complicated.”

But I’m not sure I can buy that from him. The whole process seems complicated — a hard work. Having a dialogue, sharing visual perspectives, finding the artists right places in the context of the whole …

LIKE A HOUSE OF CARDS

… the whole of which is the collaboration. That is — NO SOLOS. And for Jonatan, being the only curator, makes it a bit bissare.

“It is an exhibition of collaboration, but I’m the only curator — which might create some sort of hirarki. But there is a dialogue, support and a concept that holds and helps working it all out. Still I’m there at the top. But maybe that’s ok. I think that there must be someone in charge, so if there is a disaster they can blame it on me. I might be the one that builds the infrastructure and context but I absolutely see the process as collective. It’s impossible otherwise. But it’s an experiment — bit like a house of cards — and if one cards falls it’s important to have someone who can point out and remind, as a part of the experiment.”

WHERE IS THE ART?

An experiment which is really exciting!The whole concept seems to be a lot about structures, experiments and dialoges — but will there be any art?

“Of course that’s a question that’s popped up in my mind. Working with group of artists is incredibly fun and interesting yet also complicated. The concept of infrastructures, research and experiments is a big part of the exhibition — but at the same time we just want to express art. It’s a framework for the art which is exhibited but not a scale of what you like and what you see. It’s challenging to let the art stand on its own — to see if it holds — and bring to the point both the visual as well as its intuition.”

Photographs taken from Reykjavík Arts Festival facebook page

And that might be an experiment on its own. Be sure to experience you own (I)ndependent people, which was opened yesterday. And if you’re not in Reykjavík, follow the festival with us, we’ll be reporting as much as we can!

xox

2 Comments

Filed under Art festival, Curator, Curator Talk, Konsthopp, Reykjavik Arts Festival, Stockholm, Uncategorized, Visual Art

CURATING IS AN INTUITIVE & MAGICAL PROCESS

— Interview with Thale Fastvold and Tanja Thorjussen, LOCUS (Norway)

When did you start curating? Tell us something about your educational background?

LOCUS: We met while studying curating at Telemark University College in 2006, and seeing as we both are artists, we discovered that we had a many common denominators in our views on curating as well. Thale is trained in photography/text from Rome and Oslo, and Tanja in drawing/painting from Bergen and New York. We decided to work together, and founded LOCUS art and curator group. The first thing we curated was a series of video art events in Oslo and Trondheim. Since then we have curated and collaborated on smaller and bigger art shows in Oslo, Voss, Nissedal and New York. We work as curators, artists, art consultants (for KORO/Public Art Norway) and writers. In 2009 LOCUS published the book “Kurator?” an anthology of interviews with, and texts by curators working in Norway.

What is the artistic field of your curatorial practice?

LOCUS: The most important aspect of curating is threefold, 1) the theme 2) the artwork and 3) how it is conveyed/contextualized within the given space.

We normally have a clear vision and focus regarding the theme of the exhibitions. Often it has been inspired by political, scientific or spiritual events. Developing a theme, we work very intuitively, and in some respects almost scientifically. We do a lot of research on the topic; we attempt to explore and excavate the theme, and we do not have all the answers until the exhibition/project is over. For example, in our book project “Kurator?”, we investigated how curators work in Norway today, and we didn’t know from the outset what we were going to find. When we curate, we invite artists we believe will respond to, and create an interesting dialogue based on the given theme. We look at a lot of artists and follow their work, so when we invite somebody to participate in a project we trust them and their process of working.

How an artwork or the theme is conveyed is also an important part of our work. For instance, for the video art events we curated, we decided to make the screening of the videos a “one time only”-event, over the course of one evening. Our intention was that the audience should view the entire work in a focused setting, not see the work broken up in parts, which often happen when video is showed in a loop and you walk in on a work in progress.

As to the artistic field of curating, we will always bring with us our background as artists. When we work with art projects, whether the outcome is a curated show, our own exhibition, or a book, the process will always be colored by our background/experience.

Yonder” in Galleri 69, Oslo (2008)

Yonder” in Galleri 69, Oslo (2008)

Is there a difference in curating different field of arts, etc. paintings, videos, interactive works or a piece of net art?

LOCUS: Yes, and no! We started curating video art since the media is easy to transport, and we could easily make pop up video art exhibitions in borrowed spaces.

It requires much more preparation organizing a bigger exhibition space with large paintings and installations, and it can be more expensive to produce, but in essence the process is the same. We are a nomadic curator group, we do not have our own gallery space and we never know in advance if we will get public funding for a project, so we are used to finding creative solutions to different obstacles. Other elements in preparing a show – the planning, applying for funding, writing project outlines, press releases, shipping and installation – are not very different from show to show, everything needs to be done. After 6 years of collaboration we have experienced that being two does not just double our capacity, it quadruples it and often makes us more efficient than working solo. We discuss, plan and organize, and the project never suffers since one of us can always fill in and back up if the other is preoccupied. We trust each other, communicate easily and are very much in unison with the projects we work on.

What kind of qualities do you think a curator should have?

Thale: A curator needs to be open minded, flexible and good with editing, both when it comes to artworks and text!

Tanja: And be a good mediator and have a functional toolbox.

Blackening.” Galleri 69, Oslo (2008)

Blackening.” Galleri 69, Oslo (2008)

Do you think that new and digital media used in contemporary art has brought new aspects to arts and curating? Yes or no, explain why?

LOCUS: It has opened up a wider area in which to explore and experience art. Artists always question the status quo, and now digital media is just that. But it is important to create the best way to present an artwork, as everything surrounding the work has a context, now video has established the black box, painting the white cube etc. so it will be interesting to see how digital media art will best be conveyed. Experiencing artwork is really very private, it is you and the work, and so is our interaction with our computer. It is especially interesting with the new Google art project, which makes museums and art available to the public through the computer, but for a curator it is also a great tool for studying curatorial decisions.

In times of “You Tube” and the Internet, do you think a curator is still needed?

LOCUS: Yes, definitely. The curator is often the conveyor of meaning, the translator and the person who can help both audience and artists in forming a closer and better relationship with one another. The curator is also of great help to the artists; many artists want to focus solely on creating the work and don’t always wish to spend valuable time conveying their art to the audience.

What are your curatorial plans for the future? What are your personal wishes, hopes and perspectives in curating?

LOCUS: Right now we are working on a show presenting our own work at the project space at Tegneforbundet in Oslo (which opens Sept. 27, 2012) where we through drawing, photo and installation investigate what happens to the soul after death, before next life cycle. We are very conscious about the space, lighting, sound etc, and want to create a very specific mood in the room. When we create a show with our own art we can be freer or more immediate in how we alter the room. When we work with presenting other people’s art, we have to work with the artist to find out what they want to achieve, and how the essence in their artwork can be most adeptly expressed. Placing meaningful objects like art in a room is very hands-on and instinctual, and as curators we try to be true to the artworks.

It is easy to discuss curating in an academic way, but it is very much an intuitive process, and a magical process, and we hope that these aspects of curating will be explored further in the future.

Thale: I started a window box gallery in Oslo last year, within the Pushwagner gallery, where each month I curate smaller shows with emerging artists, and I will continue that project. When I curate shows or work as an art consultant, I aim at including 50% male and female artists, and I also wish to showcase younger artists. Of course, the most important thing for me is to curate interesting shows, which to me are shows that arouse something in its viewers, and give the audience a new perspective, whether this is on society, contemporary art or both.

Tanja: Through art projects and curatorial projects alike I explore something I don’t know, but which stirs my interest.

Now I am working on a Performance Laboratorium (co-curated with Gudrun Flatebø), which will be held at the cultural space Galleri 69 & Kafe MIR at Lufthavna in Oslo this fall. Initially I thought it would be interesting to create a performance lab because I did not know much about performance, I did not think I fully understood the history of performance and what performance is, it is a very mysterious art form as it is so hard to define.

Kurator?” A book by Thale Fastvold and Tanja Thorjussen / LOCUS (2009)

PHOTOGRAPHS BELONG TO LOCUS

What is the future of professional curating from your point of view?

LOCUS: In 2004 two curatorial study programs were established in Norway, and since then we have seen an escalating professionalization of the Norwegian curator. Before there where mostly artists or art historians who did this job. Last year the Norwegian Association of Curators was founded, which is an important step in professionalization, and we think the society and the art world in particular is increasingly starting to see the value of the curator. There is a great interest in contemporary art, but with conceptualism, postmodernism and all the other —isms of the last 40 years, the audience sometimes depends on someone to convey the art. Curators can have this and many other functions. There are so many ways of curating and so many venues of discussing curating, like Konsthopp, so we think the future of curating is very positive and exciting!

LOCUS is an art and curator group established in 2006 by Thale Fastvold and Tanja Thorjussen.Both educated as artists and curators we have exhibited in New York, Oslo, Trondheim, Reykjavik and Zurich. LOCUS have curated video-art events, exhibitions and are collaborators on various art projects in Norway and abroad.

Leave a comment

Filed under Art, Artist books, Curator, Curator Talk, Konsthopp, Oslo, Uncategorized, Video Art, Visual Art

NÚNINGUR / FRICTION

On-going: 14th of April – 13th of May 2012, Listasafn ASÍ (Reykjavik)

The visual art in the city — The city in the visual art

It can be hard to define what is sociopolitical art. But as far as I know  — all art in public sphere have political implication. And since our flavor of this month is sociopolitical art;  it is a must to mention the ongoing project; Núningur (e. Friction).

The project is build upon ideas by couple of artists and scholars and have been under way for a while. Together — the project deliberates about the many-sided connection between visual art and the urban community.

“Veghelgunarsvæði” by Ósk Vilhjálmsdóttir

“Heyr mína bæn” by Katrína Mogensen

“Kleine Welten” by Christian Hasucha

Photographs are taken from the project´s Facebook site

Listasafn ASÍ is working as a kind of center for the project but the the work will be published all over Reyakjvík city this year. An ambitious exhibition catalogue have been released and many open symposium are scheduled in relation to the show. So stay tuned!

Date: 14th of April – 13th of May 2012

Artists: Ásdís Sif Gunnarsdóttir, Ásmundur Ásmundsson, Berglind Jóna Hlynsdóttir, Brynjar Helgason, Christian Hasucha, Elin Wikström, Gunnar J. Árnason, Hjálmar Sveinsson, Hlynur Hallsson, Indriði Arnar Ingólfsson, Ingirafn Steinarsson, Ívar Glói Gunnarsson, Karl Torsten Stallborn, Katrín Eyjólfsdóttir, Katrína Mogensen, Margrét H. Blöndal, Nikulás Stefán Nikulásson, Nína Óskarsdóttir, Páll Haukur Björnsson, Ósk Vilhjálmsdóttir, Ragna Sigurðardóttir, Stefán Óli Baldursson, Una Ösp Steingrímsdóttir, Unnar Örn J. Auðarson, Þorvaldur Þorsteinsson, Þröstur Valgarðsson, and Æsa Sigurjónsdóttir

Curators: Einar Garibaldi Eiríksson, Kristinn E. Hrafnsson and Ólafur Gíslason

Place: Listasafn ASÍ,  Freyjugötu 41, Reykjavík

Leave a comment

Filed under Art, Group exhibit, Konsthopp, Lecture, Multimedia, Performance, Photography, Political Art, Reykjavík, Sociopolitical art, Uncategorized, Video Art

THE ACT OF MAKING AS AN ACT OF MAKING

Closing: 9th – 19th of June 2011, RAM (Oslo)

Konsthopp was art strolling in Oslo last month and as you know we do like young and dedicated artists. We were thereby delighted when we came across RAM, a gallery that partners with the Art Academy in Oslo and exhibits independent exhibitions by its students. At that time an exhibition called The Act of Making as an Act of Making was taken place, with work by the emerging artists Ann Iren Buan and Jane Kruse. According to the gallery’s homepage these two artists were chosen as they “in many ways represent the artistic sisterhood”.

Photographs by Konsthopp

Our minds and hearts are with the Norwegian nation these days and the tragic death of so many young, dedicated human beings.

Tomorrow at noon we encourage our readers do have a one minute of silence for all the victims in Norway – with a hope for a more amicability in the world.

May they rest in peace.

Date: 9th – 19th of June 2011

Artists: Ann Iren Buan and Jane Kruse.

Place: RAM gallery, Kongens gate 3, Oslo

Leave a comment

Filed under Art, Fine Art, Group exhibit, Installation, Konsthopp, Oslo, Young Art