Tag Archives: Live art

THEATRE OF LIFE ARTISTRY

Net stroll: The Artist Theater (Iceland)

It might sound risky — or even ridiculous — to bring visual arts into the traditional theater environment. After all, the theatre  is (most of the time) a vast establishment where experiments are usually not allowed.

Ásdís Sif Gunnarsdóttir / Photo by http://www.mbl.is/ Skapti

The “Artist Theater” is a group of artists from different directions that make glamorous evenings of performances in the basement of The National Theater in Iceland.

The group was originally founded at Klink og Bank in 2004 and has been working together every now and then, ever since.  In The Artist theater the audience can expect anything, the work is rarely rehearsed and the artist perform on each others work.

The Artist theater 2012 / Photo by Ingvar Högni Ragnarsson

In arts — the joy of creation is often hidden in the final outcome and is therefore totally out of sight from the audiences. This is dissimilar to what takes place in the Artist theater, where the process of creation is often in real time and for that reason — very visible.

Snorri Ásmundsson, an artist and a member of the group wrote this to explain the phenomenon further:

The phenomenon of The Artist theater is in fact undefined, founded by performance artists who had the need to have a go at existing methodology and format of performances and the theater. In Iceland there exists a strong tradition for the art of performances, here a very unique scene has evolved. A scene that surely needs to be regularly explored. Our size and geometrical isolation certainly effects this need.

Snorri Ásmundsson

Feedback of the past performances have been strong and seems to be significant in today´s Icelandic cultural life. The Artist Theater wants to evolve, awaken and contribute to all people who are ready to accept.

The Artist theater 2012: Snorri Ásmundsson, Ásdís Sif Gunnarsdóttir, Ingibjörg Magnadóttir, Ragnar Bragason, Saga Sigurðardóttir, Margrét Bjarnadóttir, Ragnar Kjartansson, Kristín Anna Valtýsdóttir, Rakel McMahon, Ástrós Elísdóttir, Símon Birgisson and guests.

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Filed under Art, Favourite of the month, Iceland, Konsthopp, Live art, Net stroll, Performance, Reykjavík, Sociopolitical art, Visual Art

FATAL FETISHISM

Online publication: KATALOG (Canada)

“Irony serves as an alibi for a fetish.” (Nathaniel Wing)

Fetish is one of my favorite words in the dictionary. There is something fascinating, disturbing and — well — disgusting about fetishism. My prospects about this perverted phenomenon; often makes me laugh.

And more people seems to be preoccupied by fetish.

The 6th issue of KATALOG — Fetish

A new issue of KATALOG was recently launched. For those who don´t know — Katalog is an e-magazine dedicated to the practice of performances and live arts around the world. The magazine is a free paperless performance publication, published quarterly by the Central Canadian Center for Performance. CCCP’s main aim is to create awareness and document performative and live arts.

Two Icelandic artists; Eva Ísleifsdóttir and Rakel McMahon presents their work in the latest issue.

 

Eva Ísleifsdóttir wrote the following words about her performance; “It´s a sign“:

… Walking around Cork city center with a big traffic symbol on my back. The by-passers offering their help but I politely said no. It was heavy and awkward. The Cul de sac is a traffic symbol that indicates a dead-end street. Using the symbol as a representation of reality, I walked the streets of Cork with a big traffic symbol on my back. Traffic symbols weight a lot in modern society, warning signs, indications, they are directing us, for our own safety. Older civilizations recognized the power of symbols and used them extensively in everything. What if the ´normal´ traffic signs and symbols are subliminally and cynically trying to tell us something? …

— Eva Ísleifsdóttir

“It´s a sign” by Eva Íslefsdóttir. Image/ Irene Murphy  

Rakel McMahon, which our readers should be familiar with, presents in the same issue her new work; “What is the purpose; it´s allreadmade.” Let´s see what the artist says about her artistic approach.

.. I´m interested in approaching and presenting my subject matter with reinterpretation, metaphors, and reevaluation of serious/humor and what is considered normal. The subject and issues I like working with are connected with gender, sexuality, stereotypes and normality.”

— Rakel McMahon

 “What is the purpose; it´s allreadmade.” by Rakel McMahon (2012) Image/Konsthopp

You can download Fetish, the 6th issue of KATALOG, here!

KATALOG is an online publication with video and sound capabilities which is dedicated to the practice of performance and live art.  Each issue deals with a different type of performance and in this issue we focus on artworks that deals with the object as an accompaniment or as the main focus of a performative work.  This call is open for artists from all disciplines from around the globe.  

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Filed under Art, Art Magazine, Favourite of the month, Iceland, Live art, Performance, Political Art, Sociopolitical art, Uncategorized, Visual Art

“I WOULD LIKE TO SET A TREND!”

Artist talk: Mimosa Pale (Finland)

When I think about Finland, a bridge between east and west across my mind. The Finnish people — speaking Swedish by law but in general so different from the Swedes. Their own language — Finnish — so different from everything I´ve heard. And how does the Finnish heartbeat sounds like? Same but — in some way — different?

Mimosa Pale is our first Finnish interviewee. She is an incarnation of coolness — not only because she is an interesting artist — Mimosa also runs a hat store, where she sells her own design  Our guest blogger, Elina Lajunen worked with her in Berlin and introduced us to Mimosa´s intriguing world — of hats.

The curator; Katharina Rettelbach used these kindly words to describe Mimosa:

Her artwork is a synthesis of sculpture and performance art. In her often interactive work, humour, lust and celebration lead to carnevaleque staging. She likes to switch context being it museum, theatre, street or church. She acts in cabaret shows with her singing saw, creates haute-couture for everybody and makes fashion shows in her Berlin flat. Mimosa Pale has visited various international performance art festivals and is currently running Atelier Himo in Berlin.

We are getting one step closer to the Finnish heart. Read Mimosa Pale´s interview here.

Photograph taken from Ausland-Berlin

P.s. If you are Finnish; we hope you can write an article and unveil the secrets behind the mysterious Finnish art scene. Drop us a line at konsthopp@gmail.com

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Filed under Artist Talk, Finland, Installation, Konsthopp, Live art, Performance, Sculptures, Visual Art

CURATING IS AN INTUITIVE & MAGICAL PROCESS

— Interview with Thale Fastvold and Tanja Thorjussen, LOCUS (Norway)

When did you start curating? Tell us something about your educational background?

LOCUS: We met while studying curating at Telemark University College in 2006, and seeing as we both are artists, we discovered that we had a many common denominators in our views on curating as well. Thale is trained in photography/text from Rome and Oslo, and Tanja in drawing/painting from Bergen and New York. We decided to work together, and founded LOCUS art and curator group. The first thing we curated was a series of video art events in Oslo and Trondheim. Since then we have curated and collaborated on smaller and bigger art shows in Oslo, Voss, Nissedal and New York. We work as curators, artists, art consultants (for KORO/Public Art Norway) and writers. In 2009 LOCUS published the book “Kurator?” an anthology of interviews with, and texts by curators working in Norway.

What is the artistic field of your curatorial practice?

LOCUS: The most important aspect of curating is threefold, 1) the theme 2) the artwork and 3) how it is conveyed/contextualized within the given space.

We normally have a clear vision and focus regarding the theme of the exhibitions. Often it has been inspired by political, scientific or spiritual events. Developing a theme, we work very intuitively, and in some respects almost scientifically. We do a lot of research on the topic; we attempt to explore and excavate the theme, and we do not have all the answers until the exhibition/project is over. For example, in our book project “Kurator?”, we investigated how curators work in Norway today, and we didn’t know from the outset what we were going to find. When we curate, we invite artists we believe will respond to, and create an interesting dialogue based on the given theme. We look at a lot of artists and follow their work, so when we invite somebody to participate in a project we trust them and their process of working.

How an artwork or the theme is conveyed is also an important part of our work. For instance, for the video art events we curated, we decided to make the screening of the videos a “one time only”-event, over the course of one evening. Our intention was that the audience should view the entire work in a focused setting, not see the work broken up in parts, which often happen when video is showed in a loop and you walk in on a work in progress.

As to the artistic field of curating, we will always bring with us our background as artists. When we work with art projects, whether the outcome is a curated show, our own exhibition, or a book, the process will always be colored by our background/experience.

Yonder” in Galleri 69, Oslo (2008)

Yonder” in Galleri 69, Oslo (2008)

Is there a difference in curating different field of arts, etc. paintings, videos, interactive works or a piece of net art?

LOCUS: Yes, and no! We started curating video art since the media is easy to transport, and we could easily make pop up video art exhibitions in borrowed spaces.

It requires much more preparation organizing a bigger exhibition space with large paintings and installations, and it can be more expensive to produce, but in essence the process is the same. We are a nomadic curator group, we do not have our own gallery space and we never know in advance if we will get public funding for a project, so we are used to finding creative solutions to different obstacles. Other elements in preparing a show – the planning, applying for funding, writing project outlines, press releases, shipping and installation – are not very different from show to show, everything needs to be done. After 6 years of collaboration we have experienced that being two does not just double our capacity, it quadruples it and often makes us more efficient than working solo. We discuss, plan and organize, and the project never suffers since one of us can always fill in and back up if the other is preoccupied. We trust each other, communicate easily and are very much in unison with the projects we work on.

What kind of qualities do you think a curator should have?

Thale: A curator needs to be open minded, flexible and good with editing, both when it comes to artworks and text!

Tanja: And be a good mediator and have a functional toolbox.

Blackening.” Galleri 69, Oslo (2008)

Blackening.” Galleri 69, Oslo (2008)

Do you think that new and digital media used in contemporary art has brought new aspects to arts and curating? Yes or no, explain why?

LOCUS: It has opened up a wider area in which to explore and experience art. Artists always question the status quo, and now digital media is just that. But it is important to create the best way to present an artwork, as everything surrounding the work has a context, now video has established the black box, painting the white cube etc. so it will be interesting to see how digital media art will best be conveyed. Experiencing artwork is really very private, it is you and the work, and so is our interaction with our computer. It is especially interesting with the new Google art project, which makes museums and art available to the public through the computer, but for a curator it is also a great tool for studying curatorial decisions.

In times of “You Tube” and the Internet, do you think a curator is still needed?

LOCUS: Yes, definitely. The curator is often the conveyor of meaning, the translator and the person who can help both audience and artists in forming a closer and better relationship with one another. The curator is also of great help to the artists; many artists want to focus solely on creating the work and don’t always wish to spend valuable time conveying their art to the audience.

What are your curatorial plans for the future? What are your personal wishes, hopes and perspectives in curating?

LOCUS: Right now we are working on a show presenting our own work at the project space at Tegneforbundet in Oslo (which opens Sept. 27, 2012) where we through drawing, photo and installation investigate what happens to the soul after death, before next life cycle. We are very conscious about the space, lighting, sound etc, and want to create a very specific mood in the room. When we create a show with our own art we can be freer or more immediate in how we alter the room. When we work with presenting other people’s art, we have to work with the artist to find out what they want to achieve, and how the essence in their artwork can be most adeptly expressed. Placing meaningful objects like art in a room is very hands-on and instinctual, and as curators we try to be true to the artworks.

It is easy to discuss curating in an academic way, but it is very much an intuitive process, and a magical process, and we hope that these aspects of curating will be explored further in the future.

Thale: I started a window box gallery in Oslo last year, within the Pushwagner gallery, where each month I curate smaller shows with emerging artists, and I will continue that project. When I curate shows or work as an art consultant, I aim at including 50% male and female artists, and I also wish to showcase younger artists. Of course, the most important thing for me is to curate interesting shows, which to me are shows that arouse something in its viewers, and give the audience a new perspective, whether this is on society, contemporary art or both.

Tanja: Through art projects and curatorial projects alike I explore something I don’t know, but which stirs my interest.

Now I am working on a Performance Laboratorium (co-curated with Gudrun Flatebø), which will be held at the cultural space Galleri 69 & Kafe MIR at Lufthavna in Oslo this fall. Initially I thought it would be interesting to create a performance lab because I did not know much about performance, I did not think I fully understood the history of performance and what performance is, it is a very mysterious art form as it is so hard to define.

Kurator?” A book by Thale Fastvold and Tanja Thorjussen / LOCUS (2009)

PHOTOGRAPHS BELONG TO LOCUS

What is the future of professional curating from your point of view?

LOCUS: In 2004 two curatorial study programs were established in Norway, and since then we have seen an escalating professionalization of the Norwegian curator. Before there where mostly artists or art historians who did this job. Last year the Norwegian Association of Curators was founded, which is an important step in professionalization, and we think the society and the art world in particular is increasingly starting to see the value of the curator. There is a great interest in contemporary art, but with conceptualism, postmodernism and all the other —isms of the last 40 years, the audience sometimes depends on someone to convey the art. Curators can have this and many other functions. There are so many ways of curating and so many venues of discussing curating, like Konsthopp, so we think the future of curating is very positive and exciting!

LOCUS is an art and curator group established in 2006 by Thale Fastvold and Tanja Thorjussen.Both educated as artists and curators we have exhibited in New York, Oslo, Trondheim, Reykjavik and Zurich. LOCUS have curated video-art events, exhibitions and are collaborators on various art projects in Norway and abroad.

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Filed under Art, Artist books, Curator, Curator Talk, Konsthopp, Oslo, Uncategorized, Video Art, Visual Art

STREET LIFE

Net stroll: 16th of February 2012

London, Paris, Rome …

Writing on walls has been a part of the humanity for centuries. Wherever you go, you find street art, graffiti or what some people might consider — art crimes. Since my teenage years, I have always admire this kind of art. Street art can even make structures like bus stops, bridges and subways look more interesting.

The pictures below shows street art around the world.

Los Angeles

Athens

Berlin

London

New York

Photos are taken from Etsy.com

I´m going to end this net stroll with an old time favorite. Ladies and gentleman, let´s play Street Life!

I play the streetlife, because there’s no place I can go
Streetlife – it’s the only life I know
Streetlife – and there’s a thousand parts to play
Streetlife – until you play your life away

You let the people see, just who you wanna be
And every night you shine, just like a super star
That’s how the life is played a temptin masquerade
You dress, you walk, you talk
You’re who you think you are

Streetlife …

Streetlife …

— (Randy Crawford)

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Filed under Art, Graffiti, Installation, Konsthopp, Live art, Net stroll, Political Art, Street Art, Uncategorized, Young Art

TOP TEN ART EVENTS OF 2011

Highlights of the year

The first year of Konsthopp has been challenging, exciting and certainly eventful. Over the last couple of months we have visit over two hundred art exhibitions in Sweden, Denmark, Norway, Finland, Iceland and U.K. These exhibitions have been in three descriptive words; wicked, weird and wild. The list below, our highlights of the passing year, includes the three w — and everything in between.

We are already turning our eyes to 2012 and looking forward to it.

Dear readers, thank you for your trusty support and happy new year!

/Írena & Ingunn

#1 Suitable Suits

(Elin Eng; Galleri KG52)

#2 Dreams of Salikon

(Lindalovisa Fernqvist; Meeting ROOM)

#3 Lord of the castle itch yes

(Leif Holmstrand; CHRYSTAL)

#4 De gamla grekiskorna

(Christian Sandell; ID:I galleri)

#5 Back and Forth

(Gatëan Rusquet; ANTI Festival)

#6 Dance Drawings

(Meghann Snow; Young Art)

#7 Devoured

(Johnny Boy Eriksson; Wetterling gallery)

#8 Pure Evil

(Pure Evil; The Scarlett Gallery)

#9 Help Young Worlds

(Ad de Jong; Gallery 1857)

#10 Again words will pass through our bodies, above our heads

(Jenny Grönvall; Studio 44)

Photographs by Konsthopp

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Filed under Art, Art festival, Artist Talk, Copenhagen, Design, Drawings, Fashion, Fine Art, Illustrations, Installation, Konsthopp, Live art, Oslo, Performance, Reykjavík, Solo exhibit, Stockholm, Street Art, Textile Art, Video Art, Visual Art, Young Art

7 DAY DRUNK

Performance: 1st of October 2011 at 9 pm, ANTI  Festival (Kuopio)

We all like a drink, right?

Bryany Kimmings (UK)

Photograph by Konsthopp

She appeared barefoot on the stage, dressing like a cloud  — but still sophisticated.  “I´m a seriously bad drinker,” she shouted to the audience. “And I sleep around when I´m drunk”, Kimmings continued with a finesse “do-you-want-a-cup-of-a-tee” accent.

Let´s forget the sophistication I mentioned.

“Pussy, vagina, mirri, pillu, cunt” … “tampon socket, sausage wallet, hairy pie, nob gobbler” — Kimmings knows all the English and Finish terms for pussy. Her rich imagination float naturally, while she counted up words for our private parts like schoolchildren reciting the alphabet.

Approximately two hours later…

The viewer could book an intimate moment and share a drink with Miss Kimmings. Either the queue was too long or the drinks too strong because when it was my turn — the artist was totally wasted. She said she would only go out for one cigarette but never came back. For the first time in my life, I was stood up.

Maybe she disappeared with a hottie, one-night stand or an exotic Kuopian. Because you know — she sleeps around while she is drunk.

But sometimes you get too drunk to fuck. And Bryany Kimmings was for sure one of those people that night.

And I don´t blame her. She had been drunk for seven days.

P.s. I still miss my date with Bryany Kimmings!

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Filed under ANTI-contemporary art festival, Art, Art festival, Artist Talk, Comic Art, Finland, Konsthopp, Kuopio, Performance, Uncategorized