Tag Archives: New York

NORWEGIAN WOOD

Net stroll: 3rd of September 2012, Børre Sæthre (Norway)

The Norwegian artist Børre Sæthre is known for his art installations that remind the viewer of the settings of science-fiction films — bringing each visitor into a fantastic and dreamlike universe.

His spaces are usually sculptural and reconstructed environments that includes; light, soundscapes or moving images. Reflection from his Nordic homeland and childhood memories can easily been recognized in his work — along with some selection of art, film, design and architectural history.

The artist is a brilliance — when it comes to building a negotiation strategy between; chaos and control — beauty and ugliness.

Photographs taken from google image

Børre Sæthre was born in 1967 in Oslo, Norway. He lives and works in New York and Oslo. He has had several solo exhibitions including; “From  Someone Who Nearly Died But Survived”, Bergen Kunsthall, Bergen, Norway, “I’ve Been Guilty of Hanging Around”, Participant Inc, New York, “Powered by Zero”, Galerie Loevenbruck, Paris and “Module for Mood”, Thread Waxing Space. His work has also been displayed in numerous of group shows.

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Filed under Art, Installation, Light installation, Oslo, Solo exhibit, Uncategorized

ARTIST DISCOVERY #6

Graphic designer: Regína María Rourke (Iceland)

Over a cup of coffee in Reykjavik last winter — my friend told me about her artist friend in New York. My friend´s friend — Regína María Rourke — is in fact an amazingly talented graphic designer. She re-appropriates both original and found images, re-balances and restructures it into a totally new artwork.

Photograohs belong to Regína María Rourke

Actually, I don´t know anything about the artist but her stunning artwork where catchy enough to caught my attention and make me more curious about her.

Happy Monday everyone!

Artist: Regína María Rourke 

Place: New York

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Filed under Art, Design, Iceland, Illustrations, Konsthopp, Print, Uncategorized

AI WEI WEI

On-going: 3rd of February – 10th of June 2012, Magasin 3 (Stockholm)

“Creativity is the power to reject the past, to change the status quo, and to seek new potential. Simply put, aside from using one’s imagination — and perhaps more importantly — creativity is the power to act. Only through our actions can expectations for change become reality, and only then can our purported creativity build a new foundation, and only then is it possible to draw out human civilization.”

Ai Wei Wei

Ai WeiWei — a Chinese artist, activist, curator, blogger & architect — concerns for the individual as a necessary part of the big mass. The on-going exhibition at Magasin 3 shows a selection of his works, focusing on his monumental installations and political work — Chinese socialism, mass production and global trade. In his work, Ai Weiwei often refers to pre-revolutionary China and its cultural and craft traditions. He seeks out iconic objects with great cultural and symbolic value for the Chinese, and then deliberately treats them with complete disregard for its worth or intended function. The artworks can be seen as commentary on the disdain that Mao’s Cultural Revolution showed the past as well as a way for Ai Weiwei himself to dispatch with conventional notions about art and its value.

Ai Weiwei was born in 1957 in Beijing. He co-founded the avant-garde artists’ group Stars at the end of the 1970s before moving to New York in 1983. There he was a leading figure in the community of exiled Chinese artists, writers and musicians and became an active member of the American intellectual and artistic scene. In 1993 Ai Weiwei returned to China where he has worked not only as an artist, but also as a curator, architect and blogger. In recent years his activism for social change in China has increased, making him one of the most outspoken critics of the regime. In October 2011, he was named number one in the ArtReview annual Power 100 list but six months earlier he had been arrested by the Chinese government and held for over two months without any official charges being filed.

Photographs by Konsthopp

As you can imagine the preparation of the exhibition hasn’t been easy as only few months into working together with the artist, Tessa Praun, curator of the exhibition was told that Ai Wei Wei had suddenly been arrested and kept detained — and as she did not know what was going to happen, she had to decide how to move on. In a Konsthopp interview with the curator, this is what she had to say about the continue:

” Together with Ai Weiwei’s assistants we came to the conclusion that the best thing that we could do in that situation was to continue the preparations of the exhibition, it felt even more so important to show his work and make his voice heard. Despite my deep concerns for Ai Weiwei’s situation I had to focus as much as I could on completing the exhibition and do so in the most respectful way”.

-Tessa Praun

One of the way was to create a reading room, which is one of my favorite parts of the exhibition at Magasin 3. The reading room (which is both digital and physical) also includes documentary films, and really gives the visitors a chance to learn more about the artist and his multifaceted efforts to foster social change in China — an activism that has already put him on a collision course with the Chinese regime.

If you haven’t been at Magasin 3 yet — go this weekend! Tomorrow we’ll be publishing our monthly curator interview with Tessa Praun — who shares an informative view of Ai Wei Wei’s work with an inspiring insight of a young, successful curator.

Stay tuned, and happy weekend!

Date: 3rd of February – 10th of June 2012

Artist: Ai Wei Wei

Curator: Tessa Praun

Place: Magasin 3, Frihamnen (Stockholm)

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Filed under Art, Ceramic Art, Fine Art, Installation, Konsthopp, Political Art, Stockholm, Textile Art, Video Art

PROTECT ME FROM WHAT I WANT

Final words: Jenny Holzer (U.S.A.)

“Stupid is as stupid does” — Forrest Gump

We all know Forrest Gump. Despite Forrest was not the brightest man, he would probably be a brilliant politician. Simple and sincere. Because all in all — stupid is as stupid does.

And more people seems to use the word stupid in their slogans. One of the most political artist of our time  — Jenny Holzer — is among them.

One of Jenny Holzer´s Truisms

It´s said that Holzer dreamed of being a painter as a child. And her dream came true. Born in Ohio in 1950, her art and her reputation began as a kind of rumour, with lists flyposted anonymously on the streets of New York in the late 1970s. In her reference to everyday experiences and emotions, Holzer’s witty and provocative slogans offer a critical reflection on modern society.

“Stupid people shouldn’t breed”  

 ”Expiring for Love Is Beautiful but Stupid”

                                   “The Future is Stupid”

“Purple” by Jenny Holzer (2008) Whitney Museum of American Art

“PROTECT, PROTECT” by Jenny Holzer (2009) Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago

“Monument” by Jenny Holzer (2008) Whitney Museum of American Art

As an artist — which is very concerned about the world affairs — Holzer has turned to declassified statements, letters and reports from the US military. Over the last decade, the conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan have preoccupied her.

Holzer’s Truisms has proliferated on stickers, posters, T-shirts, even on metal plaques. They’ve been carved on stones, projected on to buildings around the world. Lately Holzer has started painting again. And her Truisms continues to appear. Most recently on Twitter.

“Protect me from what I want” by Jenny Holzer (1983-85)

Sometimes I agree with Mrs. Holzer messages. Expiring for love is beautiful but can be extremely stupid. And my shorter version of “Heavenly father …” might be:

Dear God, please protect me from what I want, Amen!

Photos taken from Google image

About the artist

Jenny Holzer (b.1950) is an American installation and conceptual artist. She studied at Duke University, and University of Chicago before completing her BFA at Ohio University in 1972. In 1975  she started in MFA programme at the Rhode Island School of Design.

Holzer moved to New York in 1977 and her first public works, Truisms (1977–79), appeared in the form of anonymous broadsheets pasted on buildings, walls and fences in and around Manhattan.

Her texts took the forms of posters, monumental and electronic signs, billboards, television and her signature medium, the LED (light emitting diode) sign. Other works have appeared on T-shirts, tractor hats, stickers, metal plaques, park benches and sarcophagi. The LED signs have been placed in high-impact public spaces such as Times Square, New York, as well as in art galleries and museums.

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Filed under Art, Installation, Konsthopp, Political Art, Sociopolitical art, Uncategorized

STREET LIFE

Net stroll: 16th of February 2012

London, Paris, Rome …

Writing on walls has been a part of the humanity for centuries. Wherever you go, you find street art, graffiti or what some people might consider — art crimes. Since my teenage years, I have always admire this kind of art. Street art can even make structures like bus stops, bridges and subways look more interesting.

The pictures below shows street art around the world.

Los Angeles

Athens

Berlin

London

New York

Photos are taken from Etsy.com

I´m going to end this net stroll with an old time favorite. Ladies and gentleman, let´s play Street Life!

I play the streetlife, because there’s no place I can go
Streetlife – it’s the only life I know
Streetlife – and there’s a thousand parts to play
Streetlife – until you play your life away

You let the people see, just who you wanna be
And every night you shine, just like a super star
That’s how the life is played a temptin masquerade
You dress, you walk, you talk
You’re who you think you are

Streetlife …

Streetlife …

— (Randy Crawford)

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Filed under Art, Graffiti, Installation, Konsthopp, Live art, Net stroll, Political Art, Street Art, Uncategorized, Young Art

… AT THE END OF THE RAINBOW

Net stroll: 10th of January 2012, Yayoi Kusama (Japan)

Do you need to warm up on a cold winter day?

There is a blinding snowstorm and boundless blackness outside. I seriously need shades in my existence on such a day. So I start my daily net stroll searching the queen of colors — the queen of dots; Yayoi Kusama.

Photos taken from Google images

Yayoi Kusama was born in Matsumoto City, Japan in 1929. She studied Nihonga painting, a rigorous formal style developed during the Meiji period. She was attracted by the experimental promise of the postwar international art scene and ended up moving to the center of the universe — New York City — in 1958. In the early 1970’s Kusama returned to Japan, where she began writing shockingly visceral and surrealistic novels, short stories, and poetry, including The Hustler’s Grotto of Christopher Street (1983) and Violet Obsession (1998).

Kusama — which will turn 83 this year — is not retiring at all. Her countles fans can see a major show by the conceptional artist at Tate Modern in London, from 9th of February until 5th of June 2012.

I’m ending this short-time amusement with lyrics from the Rolling Stones song, She′s a rainbow;

She comes in colors everywhere;
She combs her hair
She’s like a rainbow
Coming colors in the air
Oh, everywhere
She comes in colors

— (Jagger/Richards)

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Filed under Art, Art festival, Installation, Konsthopp, Net stroll, Performance, Photography, Sculptures, Uncategorized, Visual Art