Tag Archives: Paintings

WILD AT HEART

Net Stroll: 28th of August 2012, Linnea Strid (Sweden)

Photographs taken from Linnea´s website

Linnea Strid, a Swedish painter and photographer will be displaying her stunning work next time at Galleri Diana (Uppsala) in September with the solo exhibition “Washed up and left behind.”

Check out more of Linnea’s work on Flickr or follow her page on Facebook

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Filed under Art, Net stroll, Paintings, Photography, Uncategorized

KONSTFACK SPRING EXHIBITION ’12

Vernissage: 16th of May 2012, Konstfack (Stockholm)

A glimpse in photographs from the opening of the spring exhibition at Konstfack last Wednesday. The exhibition is open until Sunday 27th of May. Stay tuned for more photographs and interviews!

 Live show & performance by Dyke Hard

“The ceremony” by Tobias Larsson

“I wasn’t allowed to wear black” by Liv Pettersson

“Lugnt, Stillsamt, Vackert” by Julia Dalgren

“PATTERN ATTACK” by Lisa Dalenius

“Smara” by Emma Persson

“Girls Club” by Karin Kakan Hermansson

“Happy meal” by Supawan Sihapoompichit

Work by Ida Bentinger

“Extensions, retractions, and missing parts” by Bianca Niabuco

“Ramené” by Emilie Florin

Work by Yusi-Chen

Work by Jonna Fransson

Photographs by Konsthopp

You can check out Konstfack´s 2011 exhibition here and here!

Artists: Newly graduates with Bachelor and Master degrees from Konstfack

Date: 16th – 27th of May 2012

Place: Konstfack, Telefonplan, Stockholm

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Filed under Art, Ceramic Art, Collage/Clip Art, Design, Digital Art, Fashion, Group exhibit, Installation, Konstfack, Konsthopp, Media, Photography, Stockholm, Textile Art, Uncategorized, Visual Art

THE HIGH SPIRITS OF COLLABORATING

— Interview with Jonatan Habib Engqvist (Sweden)

Photograph taken from OCA

Photograph taken from OCA

Reykjavík Arts Festival 2012 had its kick off at Harpa (Reykjavík Concert and Conference Hall) on Friday night. Since 2004 the festival has been held annually in the capital city of Iceland, each year concentrating specifically on different fields of arts. Last year it was music — this year it’s visual arts. As we mentioned in the post (I)ndependent People, the large-scale exhibition is a collaborative visual arts project that involves many of Reykjavík’s various exhibition spaces during the festival and throughout the summer. Two weeks ago I was lucky enough to have the opportunity to meet up with the curator of (I)ndependent people, Jonatan Habib Engqvist, in his time-intervals between answering e-mails and preparing last-minute actions. Over a long cup of coffee Jonatan told me all about the exhibition, his personal speculations about the project and his own role as a curator.

From the opening at Harpa Friday night

ONE BIG EXPERIMENT

The idea of (I)ndependent people came after a seminar called Alternative North that was hold in Reykjavík in 2011, concerning the economical crises and artists initiatives. The last two biennial formats at Reykjavík Arts Festival (curated by Jessica Morgan in 2005 & Ólafur Elíasson in 2008) were some “big deals” with big budgets. In between there were the financial crisis — and now it’s Jonatan’s turn to curate a biennale with artist-run initiatives.

“The brief I got from Reykajvík Arts Festival (Alternative power station of the North) was strong, even though it seemed like a quite job with compound co-operation between different institutions. But there was something exciting about it in terms of curating and I thought that maybe this complex co-operation might be an interesting focus for the whole biennale.”

Jonatan tells me genuinely how he never thought it would actually work out. He already had his job and gave a radical counter-proposal to the organizers of the festival.

“I thought that maybe this could be the concept itself — the collaboration — to make the biennale to an experiment and see if it holds. I received 100% support. When they said yes to the unbelievable there was no going back. And this whole support makes it a pretty radical exhibition in terms of an international biennale. The conglomerate of art galleries, artist-driven initiatives and artists groups (and their will to co-operate) is what will make this possible. You could say that the entire exhibition is like a one big experiment. Why? Cause it’s fun!”

A SINGLE SIMPLE RULE

“I have received so much support, incredibly much freedom — the organizers are satisfied as long as I keep the budget. Which is incredible and actually pretty cool.”

And from there — the collaboration — the idea starts growing. Jonatan tells me about the idea and how he really wants to take it as far as it goes. There are no solo artists, only groups and collaborations between artists — which is something opposite to the whole biennale logic.

“Normally biennales are based on superstars. And for me the curatorial process is exciting, even though I’ve had to say no to artists that are “big” and which work I like. But I have been very tough — holding hard to a one simple rule. NO solo artists. This is what the whole thing is based on. Everyone work on the same terms, there are no solo exhibitions and beside that there has to be a genuine exchange between partners, a negotiation and artwork that influences the theme.”

HOW MANY CURATORS TO SCREW A LIGHT BULB?

We discuss further the collaboration and I ask Jonatan about his role as a curator. He throws me an insider joke and asks me if I know how many curators I need to screw a light bulb?

“It depends on the budget! Everything will work out (or as they say in Iceland “þetta reddast”) as long as you keep budget. Do it yourself if you can’t afford it … So what I am trying to do is just to take some of the on-going happenings and gather them at one place. That’s what you do as a curator. To gather stuff and see what happens if you put this stuff in the same room. I see one thing there and another thing there — and wander what happens if I put them together. It’s not really that complicated.”

But I’m not sure I can buy that from him. The whole process seems complicated — a hard work. Having a dialogue, sharing visual perspectives, finding the artists right places in the context of the whole …

LIKE A HOUSE OF CARDS

… the whole of which is the collaboration. That is — NO SOLOS. And for Jonatan, being the only curator, makes it a bit bissare.

“It is an exhibition of collaboration, but I’m the only curator — which might create some sort of hirarki. But there is a dialogue, support and a concept that holds and helps working it all out. Still I’m there at the top. But maybe that’s ok. I think that there must be someone in charge, so if there is a disaster they can blame it on me. I might be the one that builds the infrastructure and context but I absolutely see the process as collective. It’s impossible otherwise. But it’s an experiment — bit like a house of cards — and if one cards falls it’s important to have someone who can point out and remind, as a part of the experiment.”

WHERE IS THE ART?

An experiment which is really exciting!The whole concept seems to be a lot about structures, experiments and dialoges — but will there be any art?

“Of course that’s a question that’s popped up in my mind. Working with group of artists is incredibly fun and interesting yet also complicated. The concept of infrastructures, research and experiments is a big part of the exhibition — but at the same time we just want to express art. It’s a framework for the art which is exhibited but not a scale of what you like and what you see. It’s challenging to let the art stand on its own — to see if it holds — and bring to the point both the visual as well as its intuition.”

Photographs taken from Reykjavík Arts Festival facebook page

And that might be an experiment on its own. Be sure to experience you own (I)ndependent people, which was opened yesterday. And if you’re not in Reykjavík, follow the festival with us, we’ll be reporting as much as we can!

xox

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Filed under Art festival, Curator, Curator Talk, Konsthopp, Reykjavik Arts Festival, Stockholm, Uncategorized, Visual Art

SIROUS NAMAZI

Vernissage: 10th of May 2012, Galerie Nordenhake (Stockholm)

Leaning Horizontal (detailed) by Sirous Namazi

Photograph taken from Nordenhake homepage

On-going is an exhibition with work by Sirous Namazi at Galerie Nordenhake in Stockholm. Through mixture of material and media (such as huge metallic installation pieces, goods from supermarkets and collage oil paintings) the Iranian-born artist focus on the urban landscape in the context of instability and failure, in his latest exhibition “New Work”. And as he has addressed throughout his artistical practice, Sirous Namazi continues extrapolating on the themes of social structures and patterns, architecture, consumption and detritus.

Leaning Horizontal (installation, 2012) by Sirous Namazi

Leaning Horizontal (2012) by Sirous Namazi

Untitled (2012) by Sirous Namazi

This is what the artist has to say about his on-going work:

Issues around belonging, consumption, chaos and order interest me. The artistic process has as much to do with demolishing and undermining as it does with creating and building. Many of my works use everyday objects. These Ready-mades originate in the urban landscape but become sculptures when presented in new contexts, namely galleries and institutions. I attempt to open up for new interpretations and discussions that affect contemporary issues.

 — Sirous Namazi, 2012

Untitled (paintings, 2012) by Sirous Namazi

Untitled (three dimensional collage, 2012) by Sirous Namazi

Untitled (detailed, 2012) by Sirous Namazi

The photograph above is taken from Nordenhake homepage. Other photographs are taken by Sophie Koch

Artist: Sirous Namazi

Date: 10th of May – 21st of June 2012

Place: Galerie Nordenhake, Hudiksvallsgatan 8, Stockholm

Opening hours: Tuesday – Friday, 11.00 – 18.00 ; Saturday – Sunday, 12.00 – 16.00

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Filed under Art, Collage/Clip Art, Fine Art, Installation, Paintings, Sociopolitical art, Stockholm

OUR EVERYDAY LIFE

Artist Studio #3 : Daniel Milton (Stockholm)

Thanks to the online community we came in contact with Daniel Milton who through his blog gives an insight into his life working as a full-time artist.

Would never recommend anyone to become an artist but the matter is of course that you make things with your own hands and with the talents you’ve picked up on the way — wake up every morning and create your everyday life, world and happiness. Make your own decisions about assignments, hours, coffee breaks and vacations. Life.
(From D. Miltons post, C’est ma vie – translation by Írena)

And each weekday, between 09.00 – 16.00, D. Milton goes to his atelier in Stockholm to work on what he’s best at — creating his art. I was lucky enough to be invited into his studio for some snapshots and in the mean time learn more about the artist and his work.

Photograph by Konsthopp

I must say that for me it is absolutely absorbing to be invited into the different studios and meet people who all tell their individual stories — but who share in common the decision of creating their everyday life as an artist.

Check out some of the photographs from our latest studio visit here or follow Miltons blog directly (in swedish) at http://dmilton.blogspot.se/!

Special thanks to Daniel Milton and happy Sunday to everyone!

If you are interested in opening the doors of your studio, please send us a line at konsthopp@gmail.com



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Filed under Art, Collage/Clip Art, Drawings, Konsthopp, Photography, Stockholm, Workshop visit

ARTIST DISCOVERY #3

Painter: Zoë Sua Kay (Portugal)

Originally from Lisbon, Zoë Sua Kay moved to England in 2001 and has been living in London ever since. She studied her Foundation Diploma at Chelsea College of Art and Design and graduated in 2010 with a BA in Fine Art from Middlesex University. Recently, the Portuguese painter was awarded with a scholarship for MFA course at the prestigious New York Academy of Art (class 2014) and will be joining the Academy in the fall of 2012.

These paintings are from her series; Self-Portrait (of me as a man)

Photographs belong to Zoë Sua Kay

For those who are on their way to London, the artist´s forthcoming exhibition “Recounting Palestine’s Stories: An Intervention” will be launched in June 2012 in collaboration with Al Madad Foundation.

Congratulation Zoë Sua Kay!

Artist: Zoë Sua Kay 

Upcoming event: Recounting Palestine’s Stories: An Intervention, London

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Filed under Art, Konsthopp, Net stroll, Paintings, Solo exhibit, Uncategorized, Visual Art

THE DEMAND IS HIGHER THAN EVER

Curator talk: Marín Björt Valtýsdóttir (Iceland)

When did you start curating? Tell us something about your educational background?

My first experience with curating was back in high school, setting up our graduation art exhibition. We were many and had very different backgrounds, so it was quite a task putting up the show. However, we did work and the outcome was better than we had hoped fore! As for further curating for my behalf, there haven’t been many opportunities. Curating is not a part of our program in the arts department of University of Iceland, the classes that teach the subject are small classes and fill up quickly so it is difficult to get in them, so going abroad is the only option to become a professional curator. But since we do know what curating is and we are curious about it a student gallery was opened fall of 2011. The gallery, which is called Artíma Gallerí, is giving us opportunity to try out curating and finding other people that are interested in the subject of curating and running a gallery.

What is the artistic field of your curatorial practice?

Usually I deal with 2d artworks like paintings or drawings. It was interesting when we decided to include one of Hekla Björt Helgadóttir’s pieces, which consisted of a lamp, broken plates and a stone heart, in the 3rd show of Artíma Gallerí. Once we started planning, it turned out that the piece would work better as an installation using the afforded space in the gallery in a different way than we first envisioned.

Is there a difference in curating different field of arts, etc. paintings, videos, interactive works or a piece of net art?

In retrospect it didn’t seem to matter much to me in which form or medium the artworks were but of course sooner or later practical matters will need to be addressed. In an ideal situation, the curator takes away the burden from the artist, of matching the artworks to an audience in a meaningful way. In reality this often results in a very close collaboration between the curator and the artist, which can be slightly less glamorous. Hammering nails into the wall or holding the ladder while attaching support strings.

From Artíma #3, work by Hekla Björt Helgasóttir, curated by Marín Björt Valtýsdóttir. Photos/Konsthopp

What kind of qualities do you think a curator should have?

Curating is a broad field of work, and every show is different. I think the artist makes the biggest difference in putting up an exhibition and how fluently it goes. When the collaboration between the artist and the curator is good, magic can happen.

A good curator sees the needs of the artist and the exhibition and does what it takes to combine it in to an interesting exhibition. Flexibility and diplomacy is important, as are social and communication skills since a big part of putting up an exhibition is working with other people and finding common grounds to work from. A curator is also a facilitator, concerning herself with practical matters.

Do you think that new and digital media used in contemporary art has brought new aspects to arts and curating? Yes or no, explain why?

Digital media is very fascinating because it can be very vivid and alive. Due to my young age I cannot say much about the effects it has had on curating since digital media used as an art form is older than I am. What I can tell is that digital media and interactive works are becoming more and more popular in the museum world so the medium is marking its place in the ‘traditional’ art world.

In times of “You Tube” and the Internet, do you think a curator is still needed?

I don’t see the Internet as having much effect on curating, as in making curating unnecessary. Museums and galleries are becoming more and more popular each year and new art fairs seem to be popping up all over the world, so the demand for a curator, if anything, is higher than ever. Youtube creates an abundance of information; years worth of video are uploaded daily on Youtube alone. My partner pointed out to me that curating is engaged in actively by the online community. People have created channels or blogs with little or no original content, consisting of other people’s artworks both collecting and connecting them, cross media.

What are your curatorial plans for the future? What are your personal wishes, hopes and perspectives in curating?

Curating is a very interesting field of work, it offers you an exciting environment to work in, where you get to know artists and their work in a close and remarkable way. I hope to do more curating in the future since I find it an enjoyable experience. If I were to further my studies in curating, I would have to go abroad and at the moment I have no plans, I would be lying though to say that I haven’t looked into it.

What is the future of professional curating from your point of view?

Curating is a profession that seems to be on the rise. With more and more museums bursting up and art fairs existing in every country I think the field of curating is going to bloom in the coming years.

From Artíma #3, work by Hekla Björt Helgasóttir, curated by Marín Björt Valtýsdóttir. Photo/Konsthopp

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Filed under Art, Art festival, Collage/Clip Art, Conversation, Digital Art, Group exhibit, Installation, Konsthopp, Media, Paintings, Reykjavík, Uncategorized, Visual Art