Tag Archives: Textile Art

KONSTFACK SPRING EXHIBITION ’12

Vernissage: 16th of May 2012, Konstfack (Stockholm)

A glimpse in photographs from the opening of the spring exhibition at Konstfack last Wednesday. The exhibition is open until Sunday 27th of May. Stay tuned for more photographs and interviews!

 Live show & performance by Dyke Hard

“The ceremony” by Tobias Larsson

“I wasn’t allowed to wear black” by Liv Pettersson

“Lugnt, Stillsamt, Vackert” by Julia Dalgren

“PATTERN ATTACK” by Lisa Dalenius

“Smara” by Emma Persson

“Girls Club” by Karin Kakan Hermansson

“Happy meal” by Supawan Sihapoompichit

Work by Ida Bentinger

“Extensions, retractions, and missing parts” by Bianca Niabuco

“Ramené” by Emilie Florin

Work by Yusi-Chen

Work by Jonna Fransson

Photographs by Konsthopp

You can check out Konstfack´s 2011 exhibition here and here!

Artists: Newly graduates with Bachelor and Master degrees from Konstfack

Date: 16th – 27th of May 2012

Place: Konstfack, Telefonplan, Stockholm

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Filed under Art, Ceramic Art, Collage/Clip Art, Design, Digital Art, Fashion, Group exhibit, Installation, Konstfack, Konsthopp, Media, Photography, Stockholm, Textile Art, Uncategorized, Visual Art

THE HIGH SPIRITS OF COLLABORATING

— Interview with Jonatan Habib Engqvist (Sweden)

Photograph taken from OCA

Photograph taken from OCA

Reykjavík Arts Festival 2012 had its kick off at Harpa (Reykjavík Concert and Conference Hall) on Friday night. Since 2004 the festival has been held annually in the capital city of Iceland, each year concentrating specifically on different fields of arts. Last year it was music — this year it’s visual arts. As we mentioned in the post (I)ndependent People, the large-scale exhibition is a collaborative visual arts project that involves many of Reykjavík’s various exhibition spaces during the festival and throughout the summer. Two weeks ago I was lucky enough to have the opportunity to meet up with the curator of (I)ndependent people, Jonatan Habib Engqvist, in his time-intervals between answering e-mails and preparing last-minute actions. Over a long cup of coffee Jonatan told me all about the exhibition, his personal speculations about the project and his own role as a curator.

From the opening at Harpa Friday night

ONE BIG EXPERIMENT

The idea of (I)ndependent people came after a seminar called Alternative North that was hold in Reykjavík in 2011, concerning the economical crises and artists initiatives. The last two biennial formats at Reykjavík Arts Festival (curated by Jessica Morgan in 2005 & Ólafur Elíasson in 2008) were some “big deals” with big budgets. In between there were the financial crisis — and now it’s Jonatan’s turn to curate a biennale with artist-run initiatives.

“The brief I got from Reykajvík Arts Festival (Alternative power station of the North) was strong, even though it seemed like a quite job with compound co-operation between different institutions. But there was something exciting about it in terms of curating and I thought that maybe this complex co-operation might be an interesting focus for the whole biennale.”

Jonatan tells me genuinely how he never thought it would actually work out. He already had his job and gave a radical counter-proposal to the organizers of the festival.

“I thought that maybe this could be the concept itself — the collaboration — to make the biennale to an experiment and see if it holds. I received 100% support. When they said yes to the unbelievable there was no going back. And this whole support makes it a pretty radical exhibition in terms of an international biennale. The conglomerate of art galleries, artist-driven initiatives and artists groups (and their will to co-operate) is what will make this possible. You could say that the entire exhibition is like a one big experiment. Why? Cause it’s fun!”

A SINGLE SIMPLE RULE

“I have received so much support, incredibly much freedom — the organizers are satisfied as long as I keep the budget. Which is incredible and actually pretty cool.”

And from there — the collaboration — the idea starts growing. Jonatan tells me about the idea and how he really wants to take it as far as it goes. There are no solo artists, only groups and collaborations between artists — which is something opposite to the whole biennale logic.

“Normally biennales are based on superstars. And for me the curatorial process is exciting, even though I’ve had to say no to artists that are “big” and which work I like. But I have been very tough — holding hard to a one simple rule. NO solo artists. This is what the whole thing is based on. Everyone work on the same terms, there are no solo exhibitions and beside that there has to be a genuine exchange between partners, a negotiation and artwork that influences the theme.”

HOW MANY CURATORS TO SCREW A LIGHT BULB?

We discuss further the collaboration and I ask Jonatan about his role as a curator. He throws me an insider joke and asks me if I know how many curators I need to screw a light bulb?

“It depends on the budget! Everything will work out (or as they say in Iceland “þetta reddast”) as long as you keep budget. Do it yourself if you can’t afford it … So what I am trying to do is just to take some of the on-going happenings and gather them at one place. That’s what you do as a curator. To gather stuff and see what happens if you put this stuff in the same room. I see one thing there and another thing there — and wander what happens if I put them together. It’s not really that complicated.”

But I’m not sure I can buy that from him. The whole process seems complicated — a hard work. Having a dialogue, sharing visual perspectives, finding the artists right places in the context of the whole …

LIKE A HOUSE OF CARDS

… the whole of which is the collaboration. That is — NO SOLOS. And for Jonatan, being the only curator, makes it a bit bissare.

“It is an exhibition of collaboration, but I’m the only curator — which might create some sort of hirarki. But there is a dialogue, support and a concept that holds and helps working it all out. Still I’m there at the top. But maybe that’s ok. I think that there must be someone in charge, so if there is a disaster they can blame it on me. I might be the one that builds the infrastructure and context but I absolutely see the process as collective. It’s impossible otherwise. But it’s an experiment — bit like a house of cards — and if one cards falls it’s important to have someone who can point out and remind, as a part of the experiment.”

WHERE IS THE ART?

An experiment which is really exciting!The whole concept seems to be a lot about structures, experiments and dialoges — but will there be any art?

“Of course that’s a question that’s popped up in my mind. Working with group of artists is incredibly fun and interesting yet also complicated. The concept of infrastructures, research and experiments is a big part of the exhibition — but at the same time we just want to express art. It’s a framework for the art which is exhibited but not a scale of what you like and what you see. It’s challenging to let the art stand on its own — to see if it holds — and bring to the point both the visual as well as its intuition.”

Photographs taken from Reykjavík Arts Festival facebook page

And that might be an experiment on its own. Be sure to experience you own (I)ndependent people, which was opened yesterday. And if you’re not in Reykjavík, follow the festival with us, we’ll be reporting as much as we can!

xox

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Filed under Art festival, Curator, Curator Talk, Konsthopp, Reykjavik Arts Festival, Stockholm, Uncategorized, Visual Art

COTTON RAGS

On-going: 21st of January – 5th of February 2012, Íslensk Grafík (Reykjavik)

Do you ever think about the material behind each art work? Where it might come from?

Well, it might come from your old t-shirt, your parent´s floral bedspread or — even — your grandmother´s curtain.

The above pieces are woven with cotton rags. Each piece is approximately 1m²

Photographs by Konsthopp

Cotton is today grown all over the world but is most often associated with India. Anna María Lind, the artist behind these textile work, met her curator, Deborah Kraak, last summer. Their meeting led to collaboration where Anna Lind wove and Deborah wrote.

The curator explained the cotton journey in the exhibition catalogue:

… After spinning, cotton yarns are woven or knitted into fabrics which are then dyed or printed. Production is now global, often from the industrially developing parts of the world. Even a simple T-shirt may be the work of several countries´labors: to grow the cotton, spin it, weave it, cut it into pattern pieces, and fashion it into garment.

— Deborah Kraak

Keep this in mind, next time you buy yourself a 10€ T-shirt at H&M!

Date: 21st of January – 5th of February 2012

Artist: Anna María Lind Geirsdóttir and Deborah Kraak

Place: Íslensk Grafík (Icelandic Printmakers´ Association Gallery), Tryggvagata 17, Reykjavík

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… AT THE END OF THE RAINBOW

Net stroll: 10th of January 2012, Yayoi Kusama (Japan)

Do you need to warm up on a cold winter day?

There is a blinding snowstorm and boundless blackness outside. I seriously need shades in my existence on such a day. So I start my daily net stroll searching the queen of colors — the queen of dots; Yayoi Kusama.

Photos taken from Google images

Yayoi Kusama was born in Matsumoto City, Japan in 1929. She studied Nihonga painting, a rigorous formal style developed during the Meiji period. She was attracted by the experimental promise of the postwar international art scene and ended up moving to the center of the universe — New York City — in 1958. In the early 1970’s Kusama returned to Japan, where she began writing shockingly visceral and surrealistic novels, short stories, and poetry, including The Hustler’s Grotto of Christopher Street (1983) and Violet Obsession (1998).

Kusama — which will turn 83 this year — is not retiring at all. Her countles fans can see a major show by the conceptional artist at Tate Modern in London, from 9th of February until 5th of June 2012.

I’m ending this short-time amusement with lyrics from the Rolling Stones song, She′s a rainbow;

She comes in colors everywhere;
She combs her hair
She’s like a rainbow
Coming colors in the air
Oh, everywhere
She comes in colors

— (Jagger/Richards)

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Filed under Art, Art festival, Installation, Konsthopp, Net stroll, Performance, Photography, Sculptures, Uncategorized, Visual Art

(Ó)SÝN

On-going: 19th of November 2011 – 8th of January 2012, Gerðarsafn (Kópavogur)

The cover of the 2nd issue of Endemi

Endemi is a new magazine covering Icelandic contemporary art, with a special focus on Icelandic female artists. Affairs on equal rights has been the magazine focal point from the start. The main goal of the editors policy is to make art more accessible to the public and to work towards a more gender-balanced media coverage of art in Iceland.

To celebrate the second issue of the magazine, a group exhibition was recently launched at Gerðarsafn — a proper place for the editors policy — but the museum is dedicated to Gerður Helgadóttir, one of the most prominent Icelandic female artist of the 20th century. In the exhibition (Ó)sýn, fourteen artists were chosen to display their work, twelve women and three men. This unequal gender proportion is supposed to reflect — conversely — the usual 70/30% (70 male /30 female) gender imbalance in management of corporations, state power and the art world in Western countries.

From the exhibition (Ó)sýn

A photograph by Anna Líndal

A painting by Jóhanna Kristbjörg Sigurðardóttir

I´m already looking forward to see the third issue of Endemi but the magazine is for sale in all major bookstores in Iceland. Personally, I think the magazine is a great and very needed addition to the limited media coverage on contemporary art in Iceland.

Thanks for us!

Photographs by Konsthopp

Date: 19th of November 2011 – 8th of January 2012

Curators: Ragnhildur Jóhannsdóttir and Selma Hreggviðsdóttir

Artists: Anna Líndal, Ásta Ólafsdóttir, Guðrún Hrönn Ragnarsdóttir, Eva Ísleifsdóttir, Katrín Sigurðardóttir, Elín Hansdóttir, Þorvaldur Jónsson, Sara Björnsson, Gjörningarklúbburinn, Greg Barret, Birgir Snæbjörn Birgisson and Jóhanna Kristbjörg Sigurðardóttir

Place: Gerðarsafn, Hamraborg 4, Kópavogur

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TOP TEN ART EVENTS OF 2011

Highlights of the year

The first year of Konsthopp has been challenging, exciting and certainly eventful. Over the last couple of months we have visit over two hundred art exhibitions in Sweden, Denmark, Norway, Finland, Iceland and U.K. These exhibitions have been in three descriptive words; wicked, weird and wild. The list below, our highlights of the passing year, includes the three w — and everything in between.

We are already turning our eyes to 2012 and looking forward to it.

Dear readers, thank you for your trusty support and happy new year!

/Írena & Ingunn

#1 Suitable Suits

(Elin Eng; Galleri KG52)

#2 Dreams of Salikon

(Lindalovisa Fernqvist; Meeting ROOM)

#3 Lord of the castle itch yes

(Leif Holmstrand; CHRYSTAL)

#4 De gamla grekiskorna

(Christian Sandell; ID:I galleri)

#5 Back and Forth

(Gatëan Rusquet; ANTI Festival)

#6 Dance Drawings

(Meghann Snow; Young Art)

#7 Devoured

(Johnny Boy Eriksson; Wetterling gallery)

#8 Pure Evil

(Pure Evil; The Scarlett Gallery)

#9 Help Young Worlds

(Ad de Jong; Gallery 1857)

#10 Again words will pass through our bodies, above our heads

(Jenny Grönvall; Studio 44)

Photographs by Konsthopp

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Filed under Art, Art festival, Artist Talk, Copenhagen, Design, Drawings, Fashion, Fine Art, Illustrations, Installation, Konsthopp, Live art, Oslo, Performance, Reykjavík, Solo exhibit, Stockholm, Street Art, Textile Art, Video Art, Visual Art, Young Art

DECADE OF FASHION

Closed: 13th of November 2011, Gerðarsafn (Kópavogur)

And more about fashion.

Iceland´s fashion designers have been flourishing ever since the economy crashed in 2008. The broken economy led to lower rents on Laugarvegur, the capital´s most known shopping street, as well as our national devil (the Icelandic currency króna) sided against young designers to move abroad. Once the money disappeared, the fashion industry took on new life. Additionally, many design shops popped up in the city center, attracting both tourists and locals.

Sonja Bent

Mundi

Skaparinn

Sock by Sonja Bent

Photographs by Konsthopp

The exhibition was extensive and featured some of today´s best Icelandic fashion design. The Icelandic Fashion Council held the exhibition but the organization recently celebrated their tenth anniversary.

And the promise of Icelandic design keeps on rising…

Date: 8th of October – 13th of November 2011

Designers: Áróra, Ásta Creative Clothes, Farmers Market, Birna, Lúka Art & Design, Skaparinn, Shadow Creatures, ELM, Kurl Projekt, Eva María Árnadóttir, Eygló, Go with Jan, MUNDI, Gust, Guðmundur Jörundsson, Andersen & Lauth, Hanna Felting, Ziska, Ígló, KronKron, IBA-The Indian in Me, Jbj design, Kalda, REY, Forynja, Lykkjufall, Sonja Bent, Path of Love, Sunbird, Thelma, Spaksmannsspjarir, Eight of Hearts, Vera and Sruli Recht.

Place: Gerðarsafn, Hamraborg 4, Kópavogur

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