Tag Archives: Young Art

AUTUMN ASSEMBLY IN AUGUST

Flavor of the month: Watershed

After a long and “oh-so-wanted” summer break — witch passed by “oh-so-amazingly-fast” — I can finally welcome my favorite season. The fall.

Although it´s sunny and over 20 °C outside my window (it doesn´t get any warmer here in Iceland) — all I can think about is misty days, multicolored leaves and my new umbrella.

Photos taken from google and pinterest

Watershed, a turning point or — a milestone are typical for this time of the year. Exciting assignments are coming up. Accordingly — the editors of Konsthopp are back to school, trying new exciting education. And I will finally move to my own “oh-so-wanted” apartment, with my “oh-so-fat” newborn.

Despite days loading work and other ethical obligations (e.g; changing diapers and doing boring housework!) — Konsthopp will try to keep on track, reporting live from the Nordic alternative art scene!

Happy fall everyone!

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Filed under Art, Art festival, Favourite of the month, Iceland, Konsthopp, Stockholm

JOYFUL JUNE

Flavor of the month: Performance art

Over the past weeks I have been asking outsiders what they think about the visual art scene in Iceland. Is it different from the rest of Scandinavian scene? What stands out in the Icelandic art scene today?

The answer was clear.

Most people I spoke to, mentioned the active and very visible performance art scene. It did not surprise me. Our biggest stars in the visual art sectors today are performance artists — with Ragnar Kjartansson and Rúrí in the forefront.

Lord of the castle itch yes” by Leif Holmstrand (2009), CHRYSTAL

 “Back and Forth” by Gatëan Rusquet (2011), ANTI Festival

Mont Blanc” by Mimosa Pale (2011) Berlin. Image/Niina Braun

Peta loves Pollock” by Rakel McMahon (2009)

Dance Drawings” by Meghann Snow (2011), Young Art

Photographs by Konsthopp

Then again, some people might ask — what is performance art?
It is not easy to answer; but I hope the guidelines below might give you a tiny glimpse of what we are talking about when it comes to this specific art form.

THE SYMPTOMS OF PERFORMANCE ART

»Performance Art is live.

»Performance Art has no rules or guidelines. It is art because the artist says it is art. It is experimental.

»Performance Art is not for sale. It may, however, sell admission tickets and film rights.

»Performance Art may be comprise of painting or sculpture (or both), dialogue, poetry, music, dance, opera, film footage, turned on television sets, laser lights, live animals and fire. Or all of the above. There are as many variables as there are artists.

»Performance Art is a legitimate artistic movement. It has longevity (some performance artists, in fact, have rather large bodies of work) and is a degreed course of study in many post-secondary institutions.

»Dada, Futurism, the Bauhaus and the Black Mountain College all inspired and helped pave the way for Performance Art.

»Performance Art is closely related to Conceptual Art. Both Fluxus and Body Art are types of Performance Art.

»Performance Art may be entertaining, amusing, shocking or horrifying. No matter which adjective applies, it is meant to be memorable.

— By Shelley Eesak,  ArtHistoryAbout.com

This month we are going to dig deeper into the field of this ancient art form!

Related entries includes; “The weird girls project” and “I would like to set a trend.”

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Filed under Art, Art festival, Favourite of the month, Konsthopp, Performance, Political Art, Uncategorized

TONIGHT X 3

Vernissages: 24th of May 2012 (Stockholm)

TONIGHT X 3 is a collaboration beeween ANNAELLEGALLERY, Gallery Niklas Belenius and Young Art. The galleries are all in a walking distance from each other and on Thursday night last week they opened up their galleries and gave us — the visitors — a great opportunity to take an art stroll around the neighborhood, mingle and see some outstanding artwork. Later in the night they invited their guest to continue the art party at Berns Salonger. Great initiative by the gallery owners and I hope they continue the collaboration next fall!

To give you a little overview of the artwork of the night; I snapped some shots with my i-phone. Hope you enjoy!

Work by Ellisif Hals / ANNAELLEGALLERY

Work by Simon Mullan / ANNAELLEGALLERY

Work by Max Ockborn / ANNAELLEGALLERY

Work by Olof Inger / ANNAELLEGALLERY

Work by Timothy Crisp / Gallery Niklas Belenius 

Work by Jan Hofström / Gallery Niklas Belenius

Work by Andy Warhol / Gallery Niklas Belenius

Work by Gustaf Lilliestierna / Young Art 

Installation by Daniel Jouseff / Young Art

Work by Gustaf Lilliestierna / Young Art

Date: 24th of May 2011

Artists: Various

Places: ANNAELLEGALLERY (Riddargatan 41), Gallery Niklas Belenius (Ulrikagatan 13) & Young Art (Artillerigatan 6), Stockholm

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Filed under Art, Art stroll, Collage/Clip Art, Group exhibit, Installation, Light installation, Multimedia, Paintings, Political Art, Sculptures, Sociopolitical art, Stockholm, Textile Art, Visual Art, Young Art

IMAGINATION WITHOUT BORDERS

Closed: 21st of April – 6th of May 2012, Hafnarhúsið (Reykjavik)

Students from the departments of Fine Arts, Design and Architecture at the Iceland Academy of the Arts, exhibited their graduate projects at Reykjavík Art Museum – Hafnarhús, earlier this month. The exhibition is usually impressive and this year was no exception.

Let the pictures speak for themselves.

Photographs by Konsthopp

Washing machine, washing the Icelandic flag ; super-sized swing ; cloud machine ; gramophone (Jónófón) in new costume — the imagination was prevailing at every turn at Hafnarhúsið and wholly without any borders.

Cheers everyone!

Date: 21st of April – 6th of April 2012

Artists: Graduation students from Fine Arts, Design and Architecture Department

Place: Hafnarhúsið, Tryggvagötu 27, Reykjavik

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Filed under Art, Design, Digital Art, Drawings, Fashion, Group exhibit, Installation, Konsthopp, Paintings, Photography, Political Art, Reykjavík, Uncategorized, Video Art, Visual Art, Young Art

“MASKULIN”

Ongoing: 11th – 30th of April 2012, Young Art (Stockholm)

From the series “Närhet viktigare än sex ” by Viktor Johansson

This month, Young Art is presenting their first “themed exhibition”, with work by Johan Ray Pedersen and Viktor Johansson. In the exhibition Maskulin, the focus is laid on how social norms of masculinity looks like, can be questioned and changed. The two artists tackle the theme from different perspectives and with different techniques but come together in their interest of the expectations and definitions of today’s manliness.

“Utan titel” by Johan Ray Pedersen 

Johan Ray Pedersen (b. 1975) focuses on the stereotypical male ideal of society and the arts. For two years he has been working with paintings and collage, studying classical male attributes and symbols, such as penises, horses, bodybuilders and industrial environments. The paradox in choices of subjects can both go against and emphasize what is considered to be masculine but still un-masculine to portray. According to himself, he has even been asked if he isn’t afraid to become gay, while painting penises! With his work Johan wants to de-dramatize the emphases on what is feminine or masculine  – and instead focus on what is human. Or as he self puts it:

“Is it really that dangerous to paint some penises?”

“Golden Receiver” by Johan Ray Pedersen

“Göteborg” by Johan Ray Pedersen

From the series “Vem mäter mina drömmar” by Johan Ray Pederses

Viktor Johansson (b. 1987) works with photography as an artistic medium. In the past year, he has (among other projects) examined men in groups and their fear of physical contact. For the exhibition, Viktor Johansson has chosen to follow five male friendship pairs, portraying best friends and their way of socializing. The theory he carries is that men often only have one or two friends where the physical contact is natural, artless, and without prejudice. Through his photographs Viktor Johansson questions the social norms of masculinity and studies men’s views on non-sexual physical contact. Why can women, unlike men, hold hands and share a bed without anyone questioning their sexual orientation?

From the series “Närhet viktigare än sex ” by Viktor Johansson

From the series “Närhet viktigare än sex ” by Viktor Johansson 

“Närhet viktigare än sex ” by Viktor Johansson

Photographs by Viktor Johansson belong to Young Art / Other photos taken by Konsthopp

So– what does it really mean to be a man today? Is masculinity carved in stones? An image associated with taboos – saying that men should not show emotions or paint penises? Or is it constantly changing? As many of today’s gender debate is often dominated by the theme of how women can change, I believe the theme of “masculinity” hits right across!

As we have mentioned before, Young Art  is the place for those who are interested in enthusiastic art by emerging artists, and is always worth visiting! This time there is no exception! The exhibition runs until 30th of April 2012.

Artists: Johan Ray Pedersen & Viktor Johansson

Date: 11th – 30th of April 2012

Place: Young Art, Artillerigatan 6, Stockholm

Opening hours: Wednesday – Friday, 12.00 – 18.00 ; Saturday – Sunday, 12.00 – 16.00

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Filed under Art, Art stroll, Collage/Clip Art, Documentary, Konsthopp, Paintings, Photography, Political Art, Sociopolitical art, Video Art, Young Art

GOOGLE PHOTO PRIZE 2012

Net stroll: Viktor Johansson (Sweden)

The 24-year-old Swedish photo student, Viktor Johansson, has been named as the winner of the Google Photography Prize 2012. Viktor impressed the judges with his documentary series of Christoffer Eskilsson, Sweden’s top male 10m diver.

The jury’s motivation:

“Viktor Johansson has chosen to show us an alternative view, one that we are not used to seeing from sport photography in the media. Instead of glamorous action shots of an athlete in competition, he has produced arresting and unexpected photographs that focus on the long, lonely hours of repetitive training and practice that it takes to excel in your field.” (Nigel Hurst)

Viktor Johansson (b. 1985) studies his last year at the Nordic Photography school Biskops-Arnö (related post). You can see some of Viktor’s photographs at the ongoing exhibition “Maskulin” at Young Art in Stockholm. And if you’re in London, Viktor’s photographs of Christoffer Eskilsson will be exhibited along with the 9 other finalists photographs at The Saatchi Gallery, between 25th of April – 22nd of Jule 2012.

Congratulations Viktor!

 

Photographs belong to Viktor Johansson


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“CURATOR WILL ALWAYS PLAY AN IMPORTANT ROLE”

— Interview with Alexander Jean Edvard le Sage de Fontenay (Iceland)

When did you start curating? Tell us something about your educational background?

During my last couple of years in highschool (Menntaskólinn við Hamrahlíð) I attended numerous of art history classes and art classes. I had an especially inspirational art teacher that year, Louise Hazell A Harris, and I believe I am lucky that she has taught me. The first art show were I was directly involved in the planning, was held on my graduating year. It was an exhibition of her student’s works from one of her classes, which I went to as well. At her request, I helped the teacher promote it in my school, gather art pieces and I even made a flyer.

For me, the ball actually only started rolling for me quite recently. After I began studying Art History at The University of Iceland I got involved in a number of things. I started writing for the school paper (Stúdentablaðið), helped plan events for students studying art history and last but not least, opened a gallery with a few of my fellow students, called Artíma gallery. The reason we went into doing this was in our opinion a lack of practical courses which are available for art history students. This way we get to exercise our curatorial skills.

Our first exhibition opened in October last year (2011). I have been involved in two shows so far. The first one being a group exhibition of works by 14 artists from The Iceland Academy Of Arts. The second exhibition was called S/H/91-93 and was also a group exhibition of ten black & white works by ten artists who all study primary art education.

What is the artistic field of your curatorial practice?

I enjoy making art myself. I guess the artistic field of my curatorial practice is having a say in what art pieces are ultimately selected by the artists, arranging the pieces to ensure that the right mood is achieved in the exhibition space and also helping the artist find the best suitable way for his works to be presented.

Is there a difference in curating different field of arts, etc. paintings, videos, interactive works or a piece of net art?

Of course. Each medium has a mind of it’s own. The best exhibitions in my opinion, are those that include works of different mediums. And where the art pieces are arranged according to the nature of each exhibition space. In S/H/91-93 I had a few installations and a number of wall based works. I nurtured the artists needs while also filling the space accordingly, to create diversity. I tried to create a contrast with the wall-based art and used the installations in between to maintain balance.

From S/H/91-93. #1. “Án titils” by Magnús Ingvar Ágústsson #2. “Út fyrir rammann” by Krista Alexandersdóttir #3. “Undir smásjá” by Sólveig Eir Steward #4. “Eðlislega óeðlislægt” by Kristín Þorláksdóttir

What kind of qualities do you think a curator should have?

I think a curator should be personable and friendly. It is important for him to have a good relationship with the artist (or artists). He should be able to keep cool at all times. He should do little things like bring a pizza when those finishing touches are being added the night before opening a show.  While he should be friendly he should have leader skills and determination. A lot of things may be riding on a show. But regardless if the show is a success or not, the artist (or artists) should have confidence in the curator.

Do you think that new and digital media used in contemporary art has brought new aspects to arts and curating? Yes or no, explain why?

Internet art has been around since the mid 1990s. Since then it has evolved and so has, obviously, all technology. There was a “revolution” in digital video, making it easier for more artists to work with video. So that’s a definite: Yes.

In times of “You Tube” and the Internet, do you think a curator is still needed?

Yes. I think the curator will always play an important role in the art world. Websites such as Youtube, Vimeo, Flickr, Deviant art, Tumblr to name a few, have made it a lot easier for artists to promote themselves. It has also helped a lot of people find what they’re looking for and to discover new things. This does not make a curator less needed. I believe that just like people won’t stop talking to their friends in real life (offline) they won’t stop going to galleries and museums. Because seeing a work of art online is never the same thing as seeing it face-to-face as a part of an exhibition. Period.

What are your curatorial plans for the future? What are your personal wishes, hopes and perspectives in curating?

In April I will be curating an art show in Artíma gallery. It’s going to be the collected works of a couple of vivacious girls. They have shown a lot of potential. One of them is studying fine arts at The Iceland Academy of Arts and the other is in Reykjavik School of Visual Art. It is going to be collaborative work and some independent work from both of them. Video art, a few sculptures and I’m pretty sure there will be some wall-based art as well. I’m excited about that. In June there will hopefully be a big group exhibition to welcome the summer. There has been a discussion of collaborating with another student gallery, run by the fine arts department at The Iceland Academy of Arts. I would like to be part of that.

My wish is that future art galleries that are in similar scale as Artíma won’t have a hard time gathering funding. Unfortunately, today it is quite a task for galleries (even bigger ones than Artíma) to do this. Me and many of my fellow students are in agreement that for art to flourish “the little guys” have to be given some air to breathe.

Curators should be able to work completely hand-in-hand with artists. This is THEIR world. Artists are not supposed to be scared of consulting or collaborating with artist and vice versa.

What is the future of professional curating from your point of view?

Art history as we know it began in the 19th century. The University Of Iceland began offering art history courses less than a decade ago. In just that time a lot has happened. Curators have gotten more attention in Iceland. I believe things will only get better. In times of lessened funds towards the strengthening of artistic practice, I think interest in art and art history will thrive. As long as people keep working hard for what they believe in and others keep showing their support. Lengi lifi listfræðin! (e. long live art history).

From S/H/91-93. #1. “Triptych” by Valdemar Árni Guðmundsson #2. “Femme Individuelle” by Dýrfinna Benita Garðarsdóttir #3. “Lord Donald is a Pale Horse” by Eysteinn Þórðarson #4. “Undir smásjá” by Sólveig Eir Steward

Photographs by Fritz Hendrik Berndsen IV

Alexander Jean Edvard le Sage de Fontenay (1991) is an art history student at University of Iceland. Despite young age, Alexander is already taking his first steps as a curator. He is a member of Artíma gallerí, a curator run gallery in Reykajvik, managed by students of The University of Iceland. Alexander has been involved in two exhibition in the gallery so far, but Konsthopp first met him at the “S/H/91-93” where he curated ten black & white works by equally many artists. He will next be curating an exhibition at the gallery in April. We are already looking forward to keep an eye on this fireball in the future.

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Filed under Curator, Curator Talk, Digital Art, Drawings, Group exhibit, Installation, Konsthopp, Multimedia, Uncategorized, Video Art, Young Art